Health-Care Workers’ Perception of Patients’ Suicide Intention and Factors Leading to It

A Qualitative Study

Lei Hum Wee, Norhayati Ibrahim, Suzaily Wahab, Uma Visvalingam, Seen Heng Yeoh, Ching Sin Siau

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study explored health-care workers’ perception of patients’ suicide intention and their understanding of factors leading to particular interpretations. Semistructured face-to-face in-depth interviews were conducted with 32 health-care workers from a general hospital in Klang Valley, Malaysia. Interview data were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using the interpretative phenomenological analysis. The health-care workers were found to have four types of perceptions: to end life, not to end life, ambivalence about intention, and an evolving understanding of intention. Factors leading to their perceptions of patients’ suicide intention were patient demographics, health status, severity of ideation/attempt, suicide method, history of treatment, moral character, communication of suicide intention, affective/cognitive status, availability of social support, and health-care workers’ limited knowledge of patients’ condition/situation. Insufficient knowledge and negative attitudes toward suicidal patients led to risk minimization and empathic failure, although most health-care workers used the correct parameters in determining suicide intention.

Original languageEnglish
JournalOmega (United States)
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Fingerprint

Suicide
suicide
health care
Delivery of Health Care
worker
Interviews
suicide attempt
Malaysia
interview
ambivalence
General Hospitals
Social Support
Health Status
health status
social support
Communication
Demography
interpretation
communication

Keywords

  • attitude toward death
  • euthanasia
  • hospital
  • right to die
  • suicide

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
  • Life-span and Life-course Studies

Cite this

Health-Care Workers’ Perception of Patients’ Suicide Intention and Factors Leading to It : A Qualitative Study. / Wee, Lei Hum; Ibrahim, Norhayati; Wahab, Suzaily; Visvalingam, Uma; Yeoh, Seen Heng; Siau, Ching Sin.

In: Omega (United States), 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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