Health-care professionals’ approach in feeding term small-for-gestational age infants and its potential implications to later growth outcomes

Le Ye Lee, Leilani Muhardi, Cheah Fook Choe, Sarayut Supapannachart, Inga C. Teller, Jacques Bindels, Eline M. van Der Beek, Ruurd M. van Elburg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To understand feeding practices, nutrition management and postnatal growth monitoring of term small-for-gestational age (tSGA) infants in Southeast Asia. Methods: Anonymous questionnaires to assess practices on feeding, nutrition management and post-natal growth monitoring of tSGA infants were distributed among health-care professionals (HCPs) participating in regional/local perinatology symposia in Malaysia, Thailand and Singapore. Results: Three hundred seventy-seven respondents from Malaysia (37%), Thailand (27%), Singapore (18%) and other Asian countries (19%) participated in the survey. Respondents were neonatologists (35%), paediatricians (25%) and other HCPs (40%) including nurses and midwives. Exclusive human milk feeding was reported the most preferred feeding option for tSGA infants, followed by fortified human milk feeding (60% and 20%, respectively). This was consistent among the different countries. The perceived nutrient requirements of tSGA infants varied between countries. Most respondents from Malaysia and Singapore reported requirements to be similar to preterm infants, while the majority from Thailand reported that it was less than those of preterm infants. The World Health Organization Growth Chart of 2006 and Fenton Growth Charts of 2013 were the most frequently used charts for growth monitoring in the hospital and after discharge. Conclusions: Nutrition management and perceived nutrient requirements for tSGA infants among practising HCPs in Southeast Asia showed considerable variation. The impetus to form standardised and evidence based feeding regimens is important as adequate nutritional management and growth monitoring particularly in this population of infants will have long term impact on population health.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-376
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Paediatrics and Child Health
Volume54
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

Fingerprint

Small for Gestational Age Infant
Growth Charts
Malaysia
Singapore
Delivery of Health Care
Thailand
Growth
Southeastern Asia
Human Milk
Premature Infants
Perinatology
Nurse Midwives
Food
Practice Management
Population
Surveys and Questionnaires
Health

Keywords

  • feeding practice
  • health-care professional
  • nutrition requirement
  • survey
  • term small-for-gestational age infant

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Health-care professionals’ approach in feeding term small-for-gestational age infants and its potential implications to later growth outcomes. / Lee, Le Ye; Muhardi, Leilani; Fook Choe, Cheah; Supapannachart, Sarayut; Teller, Inga C.; Bindels, Jacques; van Der Beek, Eline M.; van Elburg, Ruurd M.

In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, Vol. 54, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 370-376.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, Le Ye ; Muhardi, Leilani ; Fook Choe, Cheah ; Supapannachart, Sarayut ; Teller, Inga C. ; Bindels, Jacques ; van Der Beek, Eline M. ; van Elburg, Ruurd M. / Health-care professionals’ approach in feeding term small-for-gestational age infants and its potential implications to later growth outcomes. In: Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health. 2018 ; Vol. 54, No. 4. pp. 370-376.
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