Haram sources in food processing according to shariah perspective

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Islam lays down clear guidelines and legal principles concerning the legality of materials from haram sources, whether from animal or unclean sources. This article studies the legality of using unclean material in the making of foods based on the views of the four madhhab (schools of jurisprudence). The views of the jurists are analysed to ensure their practice is suitable for Malaysia. The qualitative research method used is more towards library research which involves data collection and analysis from shariah evidence as well as turath (original Arabic) books. The reason is that jurists differ in their views on the issue of modification or transformation of unclean material in food products. Hence, this article discusses the grounds for fiqh views relating to foods made from haram and unclean sources. It is necessary to note that the Shafi‘i and Hanbali madhhab are stricter on this issue. Their opinion is that the legal status of any product may only be ascertained from the beginning stage of its process. If it is the resulting product from halal materials, then the end product is halal. But if it is made of unclean material and haram from the beginning, then the end product is also haram. On the other hand, the Maliki and Hanafi madhhab are quite lenient in determining the legality of this issue. A food product is not considered as unclean if its original properties have changed or transformed into new properties. Even so, the two views are agreed on prohibition of all new products which are harmful and disadvantageous to humans whether directly or otherwise. Discussion of results finds that the views of the Hanafi and Maliki madhhab are easier to apply in ascertaining the legal status of products for external consumers at the global level, while the views of the Shafi‘i and Hanbali madhhab are safer to be practised in Malaysia, as the fatwa institution applies Shafi‘i princples and practice, particularly to current dietary issues.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1437-1443
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Civil Engineering and Technology
Volume9
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

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Food processing
Animals

Keywords

  • Haram sources
  • Istihalah
  • Mixture
  • Unclean materials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

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title = "Haram sources in food processing according to shariah perspective",
abstract = "Islam lays down clear guidelines and legal principles concerning the legality of materials from haram sources, whether from animal or unclean sources. This article studies the legality of using unclean material in the making of foods based on the views of the four madhhab (schools of jurisprudence). The views of the jurists are analysed to ensure their practice is suitable for Malaysia. The qualitative research method used is more towards library research which involves data collection and analysis from shariah evidence as well as turath (original Arabic) books. The reason is that jurists differ in their views on the issue of modification or transformation of unclean material in food products. Hence, this article discusses the grounds for fiqh views relating to foods made from haram and unclean sources. It is necessary to note that the Shafi‘i and Hanbali madhhab are stricter on this issue. Their opinion is that the legal status of any product may only be ascertained from the beginning stage of its process. If it is the resulting product from halal materials, then the end product is halal. But if it is made of unclean material and haram from the beginning, then the end product is also haram. On the other hand, the Maliki and Hanafi madhhab are quite lenient in determining the legality of this issue. A food product is not considered as unclean if its original properties have changed or transformed into new properties. Even so, the two views are agreed on prohibition of all new products which are harmful and disadvantageous to humans whether directly or otherwise. Discussion of results finds that the views of the Hanafi and Maliki madhhab are easier to apply in ascertaining the legal status of products for external consumers at the global level, while the views of the Shafi‘i and Hanbali madhhab are safer to be practised in Malaysia, as the fatwa institution applies Shafi‘i princples and practice, particularly to current dietary issues.",
keywords = "Haram sources, Istihalah, Mixture, Unclean materials",
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AU - Mohd Kashim, Mohd Izhar Ariff

AU - Mat Zain, Mat Noor

AU - Ahmad, Md. Yazid

AU - Jamsari, Ezad Azraai

AU - Mat Zin, Diani Mardiana

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AB - Islam lays down clear guidelines and legal principles concerning the legality of materials from haram sources, whether from animal or unclean sources. This article studies the legality of using unclean material in the making of foods based on the views of the four madhhab (schools of jurisprudence). The views of the jurists are analysed to ensure their practice is suitable for Malaysia. The qualitative research method used is more towards library research which involves data collection and analysis from shariah evidence as well as turath (original Arabic) books. The reason is that jurists differ in their views on the issue of modification or transformation of unclean material in food products. Hence, this article discusses the grounds for fiqh views relating to foods made from haram and unclean sources. It is necessary to note that the Shafi‘i and Hanbali madhhab are stricter on this issue. Their opinion is that the legal status of any product may only be ascertained from the beginning stage of its process. If it is the resulting product from halal materials, then the end product is halal. But if it is made of unclean material and haram from the beginning, then the end product is also haram. On the other hand, the Maliki and Hanafi madhhab are quite lenient in determining the legality of this issue. A food product is not considered as unclean if its original properties have changed or transformed into new properties. Even so, the two views are agreed on prohibition of all new products which are harmful and disadvantageous to humans whether directly or otherwise. Discussion of results finds that the views of the Hanafi and Maliki madhhab are easier to apply in ascertaining the legal status of products for external consumers at the global level, while the views of the Shafi‘i and Hanbali madhhab are safer to be practised in Malaysia, as the fatwa institution applies Shafi‘i princples and practice, particularly to current dietary issues.

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