Growing wealth and growing pains: Child and adolescent psychiatry in Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore

Susan Tan, Daniel Fung, Se fong Hung, Joseph Rey

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    11 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: Several Asian regions have undergone a dramatic transformation, some becoming very affluent. This paper aims to ascertain how countries that are becoming wealthy have dealt with child and adolescent mental health issues. Method: Population health status, child and adolescent mental health services, child psychiatry training, the number of child psychiatrists and related matters were examined in Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore. Results: Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore are ethnically, religiously, socially and politically very different. In spite of considerable wealth and a growing recognition that mental health problems in the young are increasing, they face similar problems - lack of access to treatment due to a dearth of services and a lack of child psychiatrists (2.5, 0.5 and 2.8 per million people, respectively). Conclusions: Because the number of child psychiatrists is so small, their ability to provide services, advocate, train, maintain a professional identity, and deal with future crises is very limited. Other rapidly developing countries can learn from this experience and should take action early to prevent a similar outcome.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)204-209
    Number of pages6
    JournalAustralasian Psychiatry
    Volume16
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2008

    Fingerprint

    Adolescent Psychiatry
    Child Psychiatry
    Malaysia
    Singapore
    Hong Kong
    Pain
    Psychiatry
    Mental Health
    Adolescent Health Services
    Aptitude
    Mental Health Services
    Developing Countries
    Health Status
    Population

    Keywords

    • Child psychiatry
    • Hong Kong
    • Malaysia
    • Singapore

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Psychiatry and Mental health

    Cite this

    Growing wealth and growing pains : Child and adolescent psychiatry in Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore. / Tan, Susan; Fung, Daniel; Hung, Se fong; Rey, Joseph.

    In: Australasian Psychiatry, Vol. 16, No. 3, 06.2008, p. 204-209.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Tan, Susan ; Fung, Daniel ; Hung, Se fong ; Rey, Joseph. / Growing wealth and growing pains : Child and adolescent psychiatry in Hong Kong, Malaysia and Singapore. In: Australasian Psychiatry. 2008 ; Vol. 16, No. 3. pp. 204-209.
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