Gross and fine anatomy of the respiratory vasculature of the mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri (Gobiidae

Oxudercinae)

Tomas T. Gonzales, Masaya Katoh, Mazlan Abd. Ghaffar, Atsushi Ishimatsu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To illustrate vascular modification accompanying transition from aquatic to amphibious life in gobies, we investigated the respiratory vasculatures of the gills and the bucco-opercular cavities in one of the most terrestrially-adapted mudskippers, Periophthalmodon schlosseri, using the corrosion casting technique. The vascular system of Pn. schlosseri retains the typical fish configuration with a serial connection of the gills and the systemic circuits, suggesting a lack of separation of O 2-poor systemic venous blood and O 2-rich effluent blood from the air-breathing surfaces. The gills appear to play a limited role in gas exchange, as evidenced from the sparsely-spaced short filaments and the modification of secondary lamellar vasculature into five to eight parallel channels that are larger than red blood cell size, unlike the extensive sinusoidal system seen in purely water-breathing fishes. In contrast, the epithelia of the bucco-opercular chamber, branchial arches, and leading edge of the filaments are extensively laden with capillaries having a short (<10 μm) diffusion distance, which strongly demonstrate the principal respiratory function of these surfaces. These capillaries form spiral coils of three to five turns as they approach the epithelial surface. The respiratory capillaries of the bucco-opercular chamber are supplied by efferent blood from the gills and drained by the systemic venous pathway. We also compared the degree of capillarization in the bucco-opercular epithelia of Pn. schlosseri with that of the three related intertidal-burrowing gobies (aquatic, non-air-breathing Acanthogobius hasta; aquatic, facultative air-breathing Odontamblyopus lacepedii; amphibious air-breathing Periophthalmus modestus) through histological analysis. The comparison revealed a clear trend of wider distribution of denser capillary networks in these epithelia with increasing reliance on air breathing, consistent with the highest aerial respiratory capacity of Pn. schlosseri among the four species.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)629-640
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Morphology
Volume272
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Gobiidae
breathing
Anatomy
Respiration
gills
Air
air
epithelium
Epithelium
Blood Vessels
blood
Corrosion Casting
Fishes
pulmonary gas exchange
Branchial Region
lung function
corrosion
burrowing
fish
Cell Size

Keywords

  • Air-breathing fish
  • Circulatory system
  • Mudskippers
  • Respiratory system
  • Vascular casting

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

Gross and fine anatomy of the respiratory vasculature of the mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri (Gobiidae : Oxudercinae). / Gonzales, Tomas T.; Katoh, Masaya; Abd. Ghaffar, Mazlan; Ishimatsu, Atsushi.

In: Journal of Morphology, Vol. 272, No. 5, 05.2011, p. 629-640.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{301e2b3776bc4d7ea01c8c22f13cb3a8,
title = "Gross and fine anatomy of the respiratory vasculature of the mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri (Gobiidae: Oxudercinae)",
abstract = "To illustrate vascular modification accompanying transition from aquatic to amphibious life in gobies, we investigated the respiratory vasculatures of the gills and the bucco-opercular cavities in one of the most terrestrially-adapted mudskippers, Periophthalmodon schlosseri, using the corrosion casting technique. The vascular system of Pn. schlosseri retains the typical fish configuration with a serial connection of the gills and the systemic circuits, suggesting a lack of separation of O 2-poor systemic venous blood and O 2-rich effluent blood from the air-breathing surfaces. The gills appear to play a limited role in gas exchange, as evidenced from the sparsely-spaced short filaments and the modification of secondary lamellar vasculature into five to eight parallel channels that are larger than red blood cell size, unlike the extensive sinusoidal system seen in purely water-breathing fishes. In contrast, the epithelia of the bucco-opercular chamber, branchial arches, and leading edge of the filaments are extensively laden with capillaries having a short (<10 μm) diffusion distance, which strongly demonstrate the principal respiratory function of these surfaces. These capillaries form spiral coils of three to five turns as they approach the epithelial surface. The respiratory capillaries of the bucco-opercular chamber are supplied by efferent blood from the gills and drained by the systemic venous pathway. We also compared the degree of capillarization in the bucco-opercular epithelia of Pn. schlosseri with that of the three related intertidal-burrowing gobies (aquatic, non-air-breathing Acanthogobius hasta; aquatic, facultative air-breathing Odontamblyopus lacepedii; amphibious air-breathing Periophthalmus modestus) through histological analysis. The comparison revealed a clear trend of wider distribution of denser capillary networks in these epithelia with increasing reliance on air breathing, consistent with the highest aerial respiratory capacity of Pn. schlosseri among the four species.",
keywords = "Air-breathing fish, Circulatory system, Mudskippers, Respiratory system, Vascular casting",
author = "Gonzales, {Tomas T.} and Masaya Katoh and {Abd. Ghaffar}, Mazlan and Atsushi Ishimatsu",
year = "2011",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1002/jmor.10944",
language = "English",
volume = "272",
pages = "629--640",
journal = "Journal of Morphology",
issn = "0362-2525",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gross and fine anatomy of the respiratory vasculature of the mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri (Gobiidae

T2 - Oxudercinae)

AU - Gonzales, Tomas T.

AU - Katoh, Masaya

AU - Abd. Ghaffar, Mazlan

AU - Ishimatsu, Atsushi

PY - 2011/5

Y1 - 2011/5

N2 - To illustrate vascular modification accompanying transition from aquatic to amphibious life in gobies, we investigated the respiratory vasculatures of the gills and the bucco-opercular cavities in one of the most terrestrially-adapted mudskippers, Periophthalmodon schlosseri, using the corrosion casting technique. The vascular system of Pn. schlosseri retains the typical fish configuration with a serial connection of the gills and the systemic circuits, suggesting a lack of separation of O 2-poor systemic venous blood and O 2-rich effluent blood from the air-breathing surfaces. The gills appear to play a limited role in gas exchange, as evidenced from the sparsely-spaced short filaments and the modification of secondary lamellar vasculature into five to eight parallel channels that are larger than red blood cell size, unlike the extensive sinusoidal system seen in purely water-breathing fishes. In contrast, the epithelia of the bucco-opercular chamber, branchial arches, and leading edge of the filaments are extensively laden with capillaries having a short (<10 μm) diffusion distance, which strongly demonstrate the principal respiratory function of these surfaces. These capillaries form spiral coils of three to five turns as they approach the epithelial surface. The respiratory capillaries of the bucco-opercular chamber are supplied by efferent blood from the gills and drained by the systemic venous pathway. We also compared the degree of capillarization in the bucco-opercular epithelia of Pn. schlosseri with that of the three related intertidal-burrowing gobies (aquatic, non-air-breathing Acanthogobius hasta; aquatic, facultative air-breathing Odontamblyopus lacepedii; amphibious air-breathing Periophthalmus modestus) through histological analysis. The comparison revealed a clear trend of wider distribution of denser capillary networks in these epithelia with increasing reliance on air breathing, consistent with the highest aerial respiratory capacity of Pn. schlosseri among the four species.

AB - To illustrate vascular modification accompanying transition from aquatic to amphibious life in gobies, we investigated the respiratory vasculatures of the gills and the bucco-opercular cavities in one of the most terrestrially-adapted mudskippers, Periophthalmodon schlosseri, using the corrosion casting technique. The vascular system of Pn. schlosseri retains the typical fish configuration with a serial connection of the gills and the systemic circuits, suggesting a lack of separation of O 2-poor systemic venous blood and O 2-rich effluent blood from the air-breathing surfaces. The gills appear to play a limited role in gas exchange, as evidenced from the sparsely-spaced short filaments and the modification of secondary lamellar vasculature into five to eight parallel channels that are larger than red blood cell size, unlike the extensive sinusoidal system seen in purely water-breathing fishes. In contrast, the epithelia of the bucco-opercular chamber, branchial arches, and leading edge of the filaments are extensively laden with capillaries having a short (<10 μm) diffusion distance, which strongly demonstrate the principal respiratory function of these surfaces. These capillaries form spiral coils of three to five turns as they approach the epithelial surface. The respiratory capillaries of the bucco-opercular chamber are supplied by efferent blood from the gills and drained by the systemic venous pathway. We also compared the degree of capillarization in the bucco-opercular epithelia of Pn. schlosseri with that of the three related intertidal-burrowing gobies (aquatic, non-air-breathing Acanthogobius hasta; aquatic, facultative air-breathing Odontamblyopus lacepedii; amphibious air-breathing Periophthalmus modestus) through histological analysis. The comparison revealed a clear trend of wider distribution of denser capillary networks in these epithelia with increasing reliance on air breathing, consistent with the highest aerial respiratory capacity of Pn. schlosseri among the four species.

KW - Air-breathing fish

KW - Circulatory system

KW - Mudskippers

KW - Respiratory system

KW - Vascular casting

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79953751191&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79953751191&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/jmor.10944

DO - 10.1002/jmor.10944

M3 - Article

VL - 272

SP - 629

EP - 640

JO - Journal of Morphology

JF - Journal of Morphology

SN - 0362-2525

IS - 5

ER -