Green technologies, performance and integration

Nathan Groenhout, Richard Hyde, Deo Prasad, Shailja Chandra, Yoshinori Saeki, Chin Haw Lim

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Green technologies for housing have made advances in two main directions. First, life-support systems that use natural resources available onsite are now available - in particular, solar energy and water. From the case studies presented in this chapter, it can be seen that water use can be reduced to 60 to 80 per cent of normal consumption. In houses where occupants' behaviour reduces demand for energy, renewable systems can provide sufficient power through PV and solar hot water systems alone.

Second, there are advances in material systems that reduce environmental impact. The dominant factor is the energy embodied in these materials; but the selection of materials is complex, and single-criterion systems have been replaced by a holistic approach. A framework for assessing these materials was provided in this chapter.

Lessons from the case studies demonstrate a shift in the balance between passive and active systems. The current practice of using a low performance building envelope and air conditioning for climate control has been replaced by a high performance envelope and the use of microclimate control with high-efficiency active systems. Mixed-mode systems (providing both passive cooling and air conditioning that can be selected in appropriate conditions) are also effective.

High performance envelopes are focused principally on reducing heat gain. This involve the use of light-coloured external surfaces, shading, lower U values for transparent elements such as windows, appropriate glazing ratios 15 per cent) and higher levels of insulation (R values of 2.7 for walls and 3.5 for roofs). The use of insulation, including radiant barriers, is critical for rejecting heat.

The capital cost of improving the performance is offset against reduced life-cycle costs, including energy costs and maintenance.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBioclimatic Housing Innovative Designs for Warm Climates
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages367-425
Number of pages59
ISBN (Print)9781849770569
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Environmental technology
Air conditioning
Insulation
Climate control
Costs
Water
Natural resources
Roofs
Solar energy
Environmental impact
Life cycle
Cooling
Energy
Hot Temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

Groenhout, N., Hyde, R., Prasad, D., Chandra, S., Saeki, Y., & Lim, C. H. (2012). Green technologies, performance and integration. In Bioclimatic Housing Innovative Designs for Warm Climates (pp. 367-425). Taylor and Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781849770569

Green technologies, performance and integration. / Groenhout, Nathan; Hyde, Richard; Prasad, Deo; Chandra, Shailja; Saeki, Yoshinori; Lim, Chin Haw.

Bioclimatic Housing Innovative Designs for Warm Climates. Taylor and Francis, 2012. p. 367-425.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Groenhout, N, Hyde, R, Prasad, D, Chandra, S, Saeki, Y & Lim, CH 2012, Green technologies, performance and integration. in Bioclimatic Housing Innovative Designs for Warm Climates. Taylor and Francis, pp. 367-425. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781849770569
Groenhout N, Hyde R, Prasad D, Chandra S, Saeki Y, Lim CH. Green technologies, performance and integration. In Bioclimatic Housing Innovative Designs for Warm Climates. Taylor and Francis. 2012. p. 367-425 https://doi.org/10.4324/9781849770569
Groenhout, Nathan ; Hyde, Richard ; Prasad, Deo ; Chandra, Shailja ; Saeki, Yoshinori ; Lim, Chin Haw. / Green technologies, performance and integration. Bioclimatic Housing Innovative Designs for Warm Climates. Taylor and Francis, 2012. pp. 367-425
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