Grafting eco-diasporic identity in Randa abdel-fattah’s selected novels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper is based on three selected novels entitled Does My Head Look Big In This? (2005), Ten Things I Hate About Me (2006), and Where The Streets Had A Name (2008) written by Randa Abdel-Fattah (1979), a Palestinian-Egyptian Australian Muslim diasporic writer. In this article, we examine the manifestations of grafting eco-diasporic identity by Abdel-Fattah in order to address how identity graft is operated by interacting with ideology, culture and nature in the contexts of the host land and the homeland as represented in the three selected novels. Using Colin Richards’ theory of graft as a framework, we explore identity contestations of Muslim young adults in the novels from an ecocritical and diasporic perspectives. In the novel Does My Head Look Big In This?, the images of Amal’s sense of being marginalised in the semiosphere of the host land and the sense of self-respect of her Muslim rootedness and heritage of the homeland semiosphere frame the fractured graft of identity. The character of Jamilah, in Ten Things I Hate About Me displays genuine manifestations of the collective emblem of the grafted identity. Finally, the symbol of the iconic jar of the homeland soil and its potentiality of regenerating Hayaat’s identity in Where the Streets Had A Name exhibits the ecological semiosphere in which the grafted identity is shaped. The current discussion, therefore, offers fresh insights into allowing a new horizon for identity grafting in Abdel-Fattah’s works as well as other writers within the tradition of Muslim Diasporic Literature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)179-190
Number of pages12
JournalGEMA Online Journal of Language Studies
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2017

Fingerprint

Muslim
Homelands
hate
writer
Novel
young adult
respect
symbol
ideology
Muslims
Homeland
Semiosphere
Names
Manifestation
Writer
Hate

Keywords

  • Eco-diasporic identity
  • Grafting
  • Homeland semiosphere
  • Muslim young adult
  • Randa Abdel-Fattah

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Literature and Literary Theory

Cite this

Grafting eco-diasporic identity in Randa abdel-fattah’s selected novels. / Almutairi, Areej Saad; Hashim, Ruzy Suliza; Mohd Mydin, Raihanah.

In: GEMA Online Journal of Language Studies, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.11.2017, p. 179-190.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{e0fbd6818fe84d61954c1a69e2f4f71c,
title = "Grafting eco-diasporic identity in Randa abdel-fattah’s selected novels",
abstract = "This paper is based on three selected novels entitled Does My Head Look Big In This? (2005), Ten Things I Hate About Me (2006), and Where The Streets Had A Name (2008) written by Randa Abdel-Fattah (1979), a Palestinian-Egyptian Australian Muslim diasporic writer. In this article, we examine the manifestations of grafting eco-diasporic identity by Abdel-Fattah in order to address how identity graft is operated by interacting with ideology, culture and nature in the contexts of the host land and the homeland as represented in the three selected novels. Using Colin Richards’ theory of graft as a framework, we explore identity contestations of Muslim young adults in the novels from an ecocritical and diasporic perspectives. In the novel Does My Head Look Big In This?, the images of Amal’s sense of being marginalised in the semiosphere of the host land and the sense of self-respect of her Muslim rootedness and heritage of the homeland semiosphere frame the fractured graft of identity. The character of Jamilah, in Ten Things I Hate About Me displays genuine manifestations of the collective emblem of the grafted identity. Finally, the symbol of the iconic jar of the homeland soil and its potentiality of regenerating Hayaat’s identity in Where the Streets Had A Name exhibits the ecological semiosphere in which the grafted identity is shaped. The current discussion, therefore, offers fresh insights into allowing a new horizon for identity grafting in Abdel-Fattah’s works as well as other writers within the tradition of Muslim Diasporic Literature.",
keywords = "Eco-diasporic identity, Grafting, Homeland semiosphere, Muslim young adult, Randa Abdel-Fattah",
author = "Almutairi, {Areej Saad} and Hashim, {Ruzy Suliza} and {Mohd Mydin}, Raihanah",
year = "2017",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.17576/gema-2017-1704-12",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "179--190",
journal = "GEMA Online Journal of Language Studies",
issn = "1675-8021",
publisher = "Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Grafting eco-diasporic identity in Randa abdel-fattah’s selected novels

AU - Almutairi, Areej Saad

AU - Hashim, Ruzy Suliza

AU - Mohd Mydin, Raihanah

PY - 2017/11/1

Y1 - 2017/11/1

N2 - This paper is based on three selected novels entitled Does My Head Look Big In This? (2005), Ten Things I Hate About Me (2006), and Where The Streets Had A Name (2008) written by Randa Abdel-Fattah (1979), a Palestinian-Egyptian Australian Muslim diasporic writer. In this article, we examine the manifestations of grafting eco-diasporic identity by Abdel-Fattah in order to address how identity graft is operated by interacting with ideology, culture and nature in the contexts of the host land and the homeland as represented in the three selected novels. Using Colin Richards’ theory of graft as a framework, we explore identity contestations of Muslim young adults in the novels from an ecocritical and diasporic perspectives. In the novel Does My Head Look Big In This?, the images of Amal’s sense of being marginalised in the semiosphere of the host land and the sense of self-respect of her Muslim rootedness and heritage of the homeland semiosphere frame the fractured graft of identity. The character of Jamilah, in Ten Things I Hate About Me displays genuine manifestations of the collective emblem of the grafted identity. Finally, the symbol of the iconic jar of the homeland soil and its potentiality of regenerating Hayaat’s identity in Where the Streets Had A Name exhibits the ecological semiosphere in which the grafted identity is shaped. The current discussion, therefore, offers fresh insights into allowing a new horizon for identity grafting in Abdel-Fattah’s works as well as other writers within the tradition of Muslim Diasporic Literature.

AB - This paper is based on three selected novels entitled Does My Head Look Big In This? (2005), Ten Things I Hate About Me (2006), and Where The Streets Had A Name (2008) written by Randa Abdel-Fattah (1979), a Palestinian-Egyptian Australian Muslim diasporic writer. In this article, we examine the manifestations of grafting eco-diasporic identity by Abdel-Fattah in order to address how identity graft is operated by interacting with ideology, culture and nature in the contexts of the host land and the homeland as represented in the three selected novels. Using Colin Richards’ theory of graft as a framework, we explore identity contestations of Muslim young adults in the novels from an ecocritical and diasporic perspectives. In the novel Does My Head Look Big In This?, the images of Amal’s sense of being marginalised in the semiosphere of the host land and the sense of self-respect of her Muslim rootedness and heritage of the homeland semiosphere frame the fractured graft of identity. The character of Jamilah, in Ten Things I Hate About Me displays genuine manifestations of the collective emblem of the grafted identity. Finally, the symbol of the iconic jar of the homeland soil and its potentiality of regenerating Hayaat’s identity in Where the Streets Had A Name exhibits the ecological semiosphere in which the grafted identity is shaped. The current discussion, therefore, offers fresh insights into allowing a new horizon for identity grafting in Abdel-Fattah’s works as well as other writers within the tradition of Muslim Diasporic Literature.

KW - Eco-diasporic identity

KW - Grafting

KW - Homeland semiosphere

KW - Muslim young adult

KW - Randa Abdel-Fattah

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85036581153&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85036581153&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.17576/gema-2017-1704-12

DO - 10.17576/gema-2017-1704-12

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85036581153

VL - 17

SP - 179

EP - 190

JO - GEMA Online Journal of Language Studies

JF - GEMA Online Journal of Language Studies

SN - 1675-8021

IS - 4

ER -