Giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension

A rare occurrence

Soo Fin Low, Radhika Sridharan, Ngiu Chai Soon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An epidermal cyst is the most common type of cyst to occur in subcutaneous tissue. When its size is greater than 5 cm, it is recognised as a giant epidermal cyst. A subcutaneous giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension is extremely rare. The authors report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented with a painless, slow-growing left gluteal mass of 6-month duration. Examination revealed a large left gluteal mass that was fixed to the underlying structures. A small epidermal cyst with visible punctum was noted at the medial aspect of the mass. MRI demonstrated a large, lobulated left gluteal lesion measuring 20 cmx16 cmx10 cm. The lesion was partly within the gluteal maximus muscle and partly within the subcutaneous tissue. MRI and ultrasound features of the lesion were consistent with a giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension. The lesion was excised and histology confirmed the diagnosis.

Original languageEnglish
JournalBMJ Case Reports
Volume2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Feb 2015

Fingerprint

Epidermal Cyst
Subcutaneous Tissue
Cysts
Histology
Muscles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension : A rare occurrence. / Low, Soo Fin; Sridharan, Radhika; Chai Soon, Ngiu.

In: BMJ Case Reports, Vol. 2015, 06.02.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2e2052b22af6467192f9c52bf6cc2262,
title = "Giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension: A rare occurrence",
abstract = "An epidermal cyst is the most common type of cyst to occur in subcutaneous tissue. When its size is greater than 5 cm, it is recognised as a giant epidermal cyst. A subcutaneous giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension is extremely rare. The authors report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented with a painless, slow-growing left gluteal mass of 6-month duration. Examination revealed a large left gluteal mass that was fixed to the underlying structures. A small epidermal cyst with visible punctum was noted at the medial aspect of the mass. MRI demonstrated a large, lobulated left gluteal lesion measuring 20 cmx16 cmx10 cm. The lesion was partly within the gluteal maximus muscle and partly within the subcutaneous tissue. MRI and ultrasound features of the lesion were consistent with a giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension. The lesion was excised and histology confirmed the diagnosis.",
author = "Low, {Soo Fin} and Radhika Sridharan and {Chai Soon}, Ngiu",
year = "2015",
month = "2",
day = "6",
doi = "10.1136/bcr-2013-202534",
language = "English",
volume = "2015",
journal = "BMJ Case Reports",
issn = "1757-790X",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension

T2 - A rare occurrence

AU - Low, Soo Fin

AU - Sridharan, Radhika

AU - Chai Soon, Ngiu

PY - 2015/2/6

Y1 - 2015/2/6

N2 - An epidermal cyst is the most common type of cyst to occur in subcutaneous tissue. When its size is greater than 5 cm, it is recognised as a giant epidermal cyst. A subcutaneous giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension is extremely rare. The authors report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented with a painless, slow-growing left gluteal mass of 6-month duration. Examination revealed a large left gluteal mass that was fixed to the underlying structures. A small epidermal cyst with visible punctum was noted at the medial aspect of the mass. MRI demonstrated a large, lobulated left gluteal lesion measuring 20 cmx16 cmx10 cm. The lesion was partly within the gluteal maximus muscle and partly within the subcutaneous tissue. MRI and ultrasound features of the lesion were consistent with a giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension. The lesion was excised and histology confirmed the diagnosis.

AB - An epidermal cyst is the most common type of cyst to occur in subcutaneous tissue. When its size is greater than 5 cm, it is recognised as a giant epidermal cyst. A subcutaneous giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension is extremely rare. The authors report a case of a 74-year-old man who presented with a painless, slow-growing left gluteal mass of 6-month duration. Examination revealed a large left gluteal mass that was fixed to the underlying structures. A small epidermal cyst with visible punctum was noted at the medial aspect of the mass. MRI demonstrated a large, lobulated left gluteal lesion measuring 20 cmx16 cmx10 cm. The lesion was partly within the gluteal maximus muscle and partly within the subcutaneous tissue. MRI and ultrasound features of the lesion were consistent with a giant epidermal cyst with intramuscular extension. The lesion was excised and histology confirmed the diagnosis.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84925618113&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84925618113&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/bcr-2013-202534

DO - 10.1136/bcr-2013-202534

M3 - Article

VL - 2015

JO - BMJ Case Reports

JF - BMJ Case Reports

SN - 1757-790X

ER -