Giant Cell Tumor of the Tendon Sheath in the Knee of an 11-year-old Girl

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Abstract

Giant cell tumors are commonly found over the flexor tendon sheath of the hand and wrist. However, giant cell tumors in the knee joint are rare, especially in children. We report an interesting case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with a painful lump on her right knee that enlarged over time. Clinically, she had fullness over the anterolateral part of her knee. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an encapsulated mass inferior to the patella. The tumor measured 3 × 3.5 × 1.5 cm. Histopathological findings confirmed that it was a tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Because of initial mild symptoms, there was a delay of 2 years from the initial symptoms until tumor excision. Her follow-up period was 35 months, and her health to date is excellent with no recurrence. We believe that reporting this rare case will help clinicians update their knowledge on possible causes of lumps in the knee, and avoid diagnostic delay. It could also prove to be beneficial in arriving at a diagnosis in future cases.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-51
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Chinese Medical Association
Volume73
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2010

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Giant Cell Tumors
Knee
Patella
Knee Joint
Wrist
Tendons
Neoplasms
Hand
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Recurrence
Health
Giant Cell Tumor of Tendon Sheath

Keywords

  • diagnosis
  • giant cell tumor
  • histopathology
  • knee
  • MRI
  • pediatric

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Giant Cell Tumor of the Tendon Sheath in the Knee of an 11-year-old Girl",
abstract = "Giant cell tumors are commonly found over the flexor tendon sheath of the hand and wrist. However, giant cell tumors in the knee joint are rare, especially in children. We report an interesting case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with a painful lump on her right knee that enlarged over time. Clinically, she had fullness over the anterolateral part of her knee. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an encapsulated mass inferior to the patella. The tumor measured 3 × 3.5 × 1.5 cm. Histopathological findings confirmed that it was a tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Because of initial mild symptoms, there was a delay of 2 years from the initial symptoms until tumor excision. Her follow-up period was 35 months, and her health to date is excellent with no recurrence. We believe that reporting this rare case will help clinicians update their knowledge on possible causes of lumps in the knee, and avoid diagnostic delay. It could also prove to be beneficial in arriving at a diagnosis in future cases.",
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author = "Arifaizad Abdullah and Shalimar Abdullah and {Mohamed Haflah}, {Nor Hazla} and Sharaf Ibrahim",
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AU - Abdullah, Arifaizad

AU - Abdullah, Shalimar

AU - Mohamed Haflah, Nor Hazla

AU - Ibrahim, Sharaf

PY - 2010/1

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N2 - Giant cell tumors are commonly found over the flexor tendon sheath of the hand and wrist. However, giant cell tumors in the knee joint are rare, especially in children. We report an interesting case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with a painful lump on her right knee that enlarged over time. Clinically, she had fullness over the anterolateral part of her knee. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an encapsulated mass inferior to the patella. The tumor measured 3 × 3.5 × 1.5 cm. Histopathological findings confirmed that it was a tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Because of initial mild symptoms, there was a delay of 2 years from the initial symptoms until tumor excision. Her follow-up period was 35 months, and her health to date is excellent with no recurrence. We believe that reporting this rare case will help clinicians update their knowledge on possible causes of lumps in the knee, and avoid diagnostic delay. It could also prove to be beneficial in arriving at a diagnosis in future cases.

AB - Giant cell tumors are commonly found over the flexor tendon sheath of the hand and wrist. However, giant cell tumors in the knee joint are rare, especially in children. We report an interesting case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with a painful lump on her right knee that enlarged over time. Clinically, she had fullness over the anterolateral part of her knee. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an encapsulated mass inferior to the patella. The tumor measured 3 × 3.5 × 1.5 cm. Histopathological findings confirmed that it was a tenosynovial giant cell tumor. Because of initial mild symptoms, there was a delay of 2 years from the initial symptoms until tumor excision. Her follow-up period was 35 months, and her health to date is excellent with no recurrence. We believe that reporting this rare case will help clinicians update their knowledge on possible causes of lumps in the knee, and avoid diagnostic delay. It could also prove to be beneficial in arriving at a diagnosis in future cases.

KW - diagnosis

KW - giant cell tumor

KW - histopathology

KW - knee

KW - MRI

KW - pediatric

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