Genetic divergence and echolocation call frequency in cryptic species of Hipposideros larvatus s.l. (Chiroptera: Hipposideridae) from the Indo-Malayan region

Adora Thabah, Stephen J. Rossiter, Tigga Kingston, Shuyi Zhang, Stuart Parsons, Khin Mya Mya, Zubaid Akbar Mukhtar Ahmad, Gareth Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

76 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The intermediate leaf-nosed bat (Hipposideros larvatus) is a medium-sized bat distributed throughout the Indo-Malay region. In north-east India, bats identified as H. larvatus captured at a single cave emitted echolocation calls with a bimodal distribution of peak frequencies, around either 85 kHz or 98 kHz. Individuals echolocating at 85 kHz had larger ears and longer forearms than those echolocating at 98 kHz, although no differences were detected in either wing morphology or diet, suggesting limited resource partitioning. A comparison of mitochondrial control region haplotypes of the two phonic types with individuals sampled from across the Indo-Malay range supports the hypothesis that, in India, two cryptic species are present. The Indian 98-kHz phonic bats formed a monophyletic clade with bats from all other regional populations sampled, to the exclusion of the Indian 85-kHz bats. In India, the two forms showed 12-13% sequence divergence and we propose that the name Hipposideros khasiana for bats of the 85-kHz phonic type. Bats of the 98-kHz phonic type formed a monophyletic group with bats from Myanmar, and corresponded to Hipposideros grandis, which is suggested to be a species distinct from Hipposideros larvatus. Differences in echolocation call frequency among populations did not reflect phylogenetic relationships, indicating that call frequency is a poor indicator of evolutionary history. Instead, divergence in call frequency probably occurs in allopatry, possibly augmented by character displacement on secondary contact to facilitate intraspecific communication.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-130
Number of pages12
JournalBiological Journal of the Linnean Society
Volume88
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006

Fingerprint

Echolocation
echolocation
bat
Chiroptera
divergence
genetic variation
India
wing morphology
Myanmar
character displacement
allopatry
secondary contact
niche partitioning
communication (human)
Forearm
caves
Haplotypes
Population
Names
Ear

Keywords

  • Echolocation
  • Ecomorphology
  • Resource partitioning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

Cite this

Genetic divergence and echolocation call frequency in cryptic species of Hipposideros larvatus s.l. (Chiroptera : Hipposideridae) from the Indo-Malayan region. / Thabah, Adora; Rossiter, Stephen J.; Kingston, Tigga; Zhang, Shuyi; Parsons, Stuart; Mya, Khin Mya; Mukhtar Ahmad, Zubaid Akbar; Jones, Gareth.

In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, Vol. 88, No. 1, 05.2006, p. 119-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Thabah, Adora ; Rossiter, Stephen J. ; Kingston, Tigga ; Zhang, Shuyi ; Parsons, Stuart ; Mya, Khin Mya ; Mukhtar Ahmad, Zubaid Akbar ; Jones, Gareth. / Genetic divergence and echolocation call frequency in cryptic species of Hipposideros larvatus s.l. (Chiroptera : Hipposideridae) from the Indo-Malayan region. In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society. 2006 ; Vol. 88, No. 1. pp. 119-130.
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