Genetic and dietary influences on the levels of diet-induced thermogenesis and energy balance in adult mice

M. N. Ismail, A. G. Dulloo, D. S. Miller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Genetic and dietary influences on energy balance and diet-induced thermogenesis were investigated in 5 strains of adult mice fed either a stock diet or a varied and palatable cafeteria diet for 4 weeks. Compared to their stock-fed controls, the total metabolisable energy intake of mice fed a cafeteria diet increased by 60, 45, 28, 50, and 35% in the ob/+ or +/+, C57BL/6, DBA/2, BALB/C and CFLP strains, respectively, while energy expenditure, over the entire period, was increased by 53, 21, 24, 53 and 34%, respectively. The results show the presence of diet-induced thermogenesis in most strains studied, and also indicate that variations in food intake were more strongly determined by diet, whereas variations in energy efficiencies were more strongly influenced by genetics.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-195
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Nutrition and Metabolism
Volume30
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 1986
Externally publishedYes

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Thermogenesis
Diet
Energy Intake
Energy Metabolism
Eating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Genetic and dietary influences on the levels of diet-induced thermogenesis and energy balance in adult mice. / Ismail, M. N.; Dulloo, A. G.; Miller, D. S.

In: Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, Vol. 30, No. 3, 1986, p. 189-195.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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