General practitioners' knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections in Selangor, Malaysia: Findings and implications

Mohamed Azmi Hassali, Tengku Karmila Tengku Kamil, Faridah Aryani Md Yusof, Alian A. Alrasheedy, Zuraidah Mohd Yusoff, Fahad Saleem, Saleh Karamah Al-Tamimi, Zhi Yen Wong, Hisham Aljadhey, Brian Godman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Antibiotics are widely prescribed especially for upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs). Their irrational use can increase costs and resistance. Aim: Assess knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for URTIs in Selangor, Malaysia, using a cross-sectional survey among general practitioners (GPs) working in private clinics in 2011. Results: One hundred and thirty-nine physicians completed the questionnaire (response rate = 34.8%). 49.6% (n = 69) agreed antibiotics are helpful in treating URTIs, with most GPs agreeing antibiotics may reduce URTI duration and complications. The majority of GPs reported they felt patients expected antibiotics, with 36.7% (n = 51) agreeing patients would change doctors if they did not prescribe antibiotics and 21.6% (n = 30) agreeing when requested they prescribe antibiotics even if they believe them to be unnecessary. When assessed against six criteria, most GPs had a moderate level of knowledge of prescribing for URTIs. However, antibiotic prescriptions could be appreciably reduced. Conclusion: Further programs are needed to educate GPs and patients about antibiotics building on current initiatives.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)511-520
Number of pages10
JournalExpert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2015
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Malaysia
Respiratory Tract Infections
General Practitioners
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Prescriptions
Cross-Sectional Studies
Physicians
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • antibiotics
  • education programs
  • irrational use of medicines
  • Malaysia
  • patients
  • physicians
  • respiratory tract infections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Infectious Diseases
  • Microbiology (medical)
  • Microbiology
  • Virology

Cite this

General practitioners' knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections in Selangor, Malaysia : Findings and implications. / Hassali, Mohamed Azmi; Kamil, Tengku Karmila Tengku; Md Yusof, Faridah Aryani; Alrasheedy, Alian A.; Yusoff, Zuraidah Mohd; Saleem, Fahad; Al-Tamimi, Saleh Karamah; Wong, Zhi Yen; Aljadhey, Hisham; Godman, Brian.

In: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy, Vol. 13, No. 4, 01.04.2015, p. 511-520.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hassali, MA, Kamil, TKT, Md Yusof, FA, Alrasheedy, AA, Yusoff, ZM, Saleem, F, Al-Tamimi, SK, Wong, ZY, Aljadhey, H & Godman, B 2015, 'General practitioners' knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections in Selangor, Malaysia: Findings and implications', Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy, vol. 13, no. 4, pp. 511-520. https://doi.org/10.1586/14787210.2015.1012497
Hassali, Mohamed Azmi ; Kamil, Tengku Karmila Tengku ; Md Yusof, Faridah Aryani ; Alrasheedy, Alian A. ; Yusoff, Zuraidah Mohd ; Saleem, Fahad ; Al-Tamimi, Saleh Karamah ; Wong, Zhi Yen ; Aljadhey, Hisham ; Godman, Brian. / General practitioners' knowledge, attitude and prescribing of antibiotics for upper respiratory tract infections in Selangor, Malaysia : Findings and implications. In: Expert Review of Anti-Infective Therapy. 2015 ; Vol. 13, No. 4. pp. 511-520.
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