Gender differences in attitudes towards learning oral skills using technology

Jibrel Harb, Nadzrah Abu Bakar, Pramela Krish N. Krishnasamy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper reports a quantitative study on gender differences in attitudes when learning oral skills via technology. The study was conducted at Tafila Technical University, Jordan, with 70 female and 30 male students, to find out if female students are better and faster in learning a language than male. Specifically, it seeks to investigate differences in attitudes between females and males in terms of practicality, confidence and anxiety. The results of the study show that there were no significant differences between female and male students when comparing the pre- and post-test mean scores. Both genders establish the same levels of attitudes before and after undergoing this course, which suggests that the exposure to language learning using technology did not contribute to any significant gender inequality. The paired sample t-test results showed improved attitudes toward learning oral skills in both females and males. The study also indicates female and male improvement in the anxiety dimension showing that their initial strong apprehension toward this course was greatly reduced at the end of the course. In terms of confidence, female showed better enhanced confidence level than male at the end of the course.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalEducation and Information Technologies
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2013

Fingerprint

gender-specific factors
confidence
learning
anxiety
gender
Jordan
language
female student
student

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Computer technology
  • Confidence
  • Gender differences
  • Practicality

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Library and Information Sciences
  • Education

Cite this

Gender differences in attitudes towards learning oral skills using technology. / Harb, Jibrel; Abu Bakar, Nadzrah; N. Krishnasamy, Pramela Krish.

In: Education and Information Technologies, 2013, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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