Gatekeeper Suicide Training's Effectiveness Among Malaysian Hospital Health Professionals: A Control Group Study With a Three-Month Follow-Up

Ching Sin Siau, Lei Hum Wee, Norhayati Ibrahim, Uma Visvalingam, Lena Lay Ling Yeap, Suzaily Wahab

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: There is a lack of suicide-related training in the nonpsychiatric health professional's basic education. We suggest that a continuing education through a brief gatekeeper suicide training program could be a suitable platform to improve suicide-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes. This study aimed at examining the effectiveness of the Question, Persuade, Refer gatekeeper program on improving the knowledge, self-efficacy in suicide prevention, and understanding of/willingness to help suicidal patients of Malaysian hospital health professionals. METHODS: The Question, Persuade, Refer program materials were translated and adapted for implementation in the hospital setting for nonpsychiatric health professionals. There were 159 (mean age = 35.75 years; SD = 12.26) participants in this study. Most participants were female (84.9%), staff/community nurses (52.2%), who worked in the general medical department (30.2%) and had no experience managing suicidal patients (64.2%). Intervention participants (n = 53) completed a survey questionnaire at pretraining, immediately after training, and after three months. Control participants (n = 106) were not exposed to the training program and completed the same questionnaire at baseline and three months later. RESULTS: Significant improvement occurred among intervention participants in terms of perceived knowledge, self-efficacy, and understanding of/willingness to help suicidal patients immediately after training and when compared with the control participants 3 months later. Improvements in declarative knowledge were not maintained at the 3-month follow-up. DISCUSSION: This study confirmed the short-term effectiveness of the gatekeeper training program. Gatekeeper suicide training is recommended for implementation for nonpsychiatric health professionals nationwide.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-234
Number of pages8
JournalThe Journal of continuing education in the health professions
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2018

Fingerprint

gatekeeper
study group
health professionals
suicide
self-efficacy
training program
questionnaire
basic education
nurse
staff
lack
community
education
experience

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

@article{8a60ec983faf4336bae84959864e5b4f,
title = "Gatekeeper Suicide Training's Effectiveness Among Malaysian Hospital Health Professionals: A Control Group Study With a Three-Month Follow-Up",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: There is a lack of suicide-related training in the nonpsychiatric health professional's basic education. We suggest that a continuing education through a brief gatekeeper suicide training program could be a suitable platform to improve suicide-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes. This study aimed at examining the effectiveness of the Question, Persuade, Refer gatekeeper program on improving the knowledge, self-efficacy in suicide prevention, and understanding of/willingness to help suicidal patients of Malaysian hospital health professionals. METHODS: The Question, Persuade, Refer program materials were translated and adapted for implementation in the hospital setting for nonpsychiatric health professionals. There were 159 (mean age = 35.75 years; SD = 12.26) participants in this study. Most participants were female (84.9{\%}), staff/community nurses (52.2{\%}), who worked in the general medical department (30.2{\%}) and had no experience managing suicidal patients (64.2{\%}). Intervention participants (n = 53) completed a survey questionnaire at pretraining, immediately after training, and after three months. Control participants (n = 106) were not exposed to the training program and completed the same questionnaire at baseline and three months later. RESULTS: Significant improvement occurred among intervention participants in terms of perceived knowledge, self-efficacy, and understanding of/willingness to help suicidal patients immediately after training and when compared with the control participants 3 months later. Improvements in declarative knowledge were not maintained at the 3-month follow-up. DISCUSSION: This study confirmed the short-term effectiveness of the gatekeeper training program. Gatekeeper suicide training is recommended for implementation for nonpsychiatric health professionals nationwide.",
author = "Siau, {Ching Sin} and Wee, {Lei Hum} and Norhayati Ibrahim and Uma Visvalingam and Yeap, {Lena Lay Ling} and Suzaily Wahab",
year = "2018",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1097/CEH.0000000000000213",
language = "English",
volume = "38",
pages = "227--234",
journal = "Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions",
issn = "0894-1912",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gatekeeper Suicide Training's Effectiveness Among Malaysian Hospital Health Professionals

T2 - A Control Group Study With a Three-Month Follow-Up

AU - Siau, Ching Sin

AU - Wee, Lei Hum

AU - Ibrahim, Norhayati

AU - Visvalingam, Uma

AU - Yeap, Lena Lay Ling

AU - Wahab, Suzaily

PY - 2018/9/1

Y1 - 2018/9/1

N2 - INTRODUCTION: There is a lack of suicide-related training in the nonpsychiatric health professional's basic education. We suggest that a continuing education through a brief gatekeeper suicide training program could be a suitable platform to improve suicide-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes. This study aimed at examining the effectiveness of the Question, Persuade, Refer gatekeeper program on improving the knowledge, self-efficacy in suicide prevention, and understanding of/willingness to help suicidal patients of Malaysian hospital health professionals. METHODS: The Question, Persuade, Refer program materials were translated and adapted for implementation in the hospital setting for nonpsychiatric health professionals. There were 159 (mean age = 35.75 years; SD = 12.26) participants in this study. Most participants were female (84.9%), staff/community nurses (52.2%), who worked in the general medical department (30.2%) and had no experience managing suicidal patients (64.2%). Intervention participants (n = 53) completed a survey questionnaire at pretraining, immediately after training, and after three months. Control participants (n = 106) were not exposed to the training program and completed the same questionnaire at baseline and three months later. RESULTS: Significant improvement occurred among intervention participants in terms of perceived knowledge, self-efficacy, and understanding of/willingness to help suicidal patients immediately after training and when compared with the control participants 3 months later. Improvements in declarative knowledge were not maintained at the 3-month follow-up. DISCUSSION: This study confirmed the short-term effectiveness of the gatekeeper training program. Gatekeeper suicide training is recommended for implementation for nonpsychiatric health professionals nationwide.

AB - INTRODUCTION: There is a lack of suicide-related training in the nonpsychiatric health professional's basic education. We suggest that a continuing education through a brief gatekeeper suicide training program could be a suitable platform to improve suicide-related knowledge, self-efficacy, and attitudes. This study aimed at examining the effectiveness of the Question, Persuade, Refer gatekeeper program on improving the knowledge, self-efficacy in suicide prevention, and understanding of/willingness to help suicidal patients of Malaysian hospital health professionals. METHODS: The Question, Persuade, Refer program materials were translated and adapted for implementation in the hospital setting for nonpsychiatric health professionals. There were 159 (mean age = 35.75 years; SD = 12.26) participants in this study. Most participants were female (84.9%), staff/community nurses (52.2%), who worked in the general medical department (30.2%) and had no experience managing suicidal patients (64.2%). Intervention participants (n = 53) completed a survey questionnaire at pretraining, immediately after training, and after three months. Control participants (n = 106) were not exposed to the training program and completed the same questionnaire at baseline and three months later. RESULTS: Significant improvement occurred among intervention participants in terms of perceived knowledge, self-efficacy, and understanding of/willingness to help suicidal patients immediately after training and when compared with the control participants 3 months later. Improvements in declarative knowledge were not maintained at the 3-month follow-up. DISCUSSION: This study confirmed the short-term effectiveness of the gatekeeper training program. Gatekeeper suicide training is recommended for implementation for nonpsychiatric health professionals nationwide.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85057567321&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85057567321&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/CEH.0000000000000213

DO - 10.1097/CEH.0000000000000213

M3 - Article

C2 - 30036213

AN - SCOPUS:85057567321

VL - 38

SP - 227

EP - 234

JO - Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions

JF - Journal of Continuing Education in the Health Professions

SN - 0894-1912

IS - 4

ER -