From state Islamic religious schools to Syariah and legal studies

Human resource in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in Malaysian higher education institutions

Nizamuddin Alias, Nurhafilah Musa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The present paper examines the importance of policy in enabling human resources, following the completion of university-level education, to be involved in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in syariah and legal studies in Malaysia.This paper argues that the human resources in the Islamic sector in Malaysia and academic entrepreneurship in syariah and legal studies are dependent on students from Islamic religious schools. Islamic religious secondary schools are usually administered either by the federal government, state governments or private institutions. According to the constitutional division of powers, education is a federal matter. Therefore, any educational institutions fall under the responsibility of the federal government, irrespective of the means of their establishment. However, state-administered Islamic religious secondary schools are considered to fall outside the purview of the federal government due to the fact that such institutions are administered by the state governments. This perceived conflict between state and federal authority in reading the Malaysian Constitution has resulted in the state Islamic religious secondary schools being virtually ignored by the federal government. This paper demonstrates the effects of the neglect of the Malaysian federal government regarding state Islamic religious secondary schools in relation to human resources in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship at Malaysian higher education institutions, especially in the area of syariah and legal studies. The current scenario in the Malaysian Muslim society will be taken into account in portraying the current need for students and graduates of Islamic studies to fulfill vacancies in the job market. The paper concludes with some suggestions to improve the development and management of human resources in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in the area of syariah and legal studies in Malaysia.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)223-238
Number of pages16
JournalPertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities
Volume22
Issue numberJanuary
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Fingerprint

entrepreneurship
human resources
Federal Government
secondary school
Malaysia
school
education
university level of education
federal authority
private institution
state authority
educational institution
neglect
Muslim
constitution
student
graduate
Federal government
Academic entrepreneurship
Human resources

Keywords

  • Academic entrepreneurship
  • Human resource
  • Legal studies
  • State islamic religious schools
  • Syariah

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

@article{1c0fbd78cb0040ddaed9119d834c4b9e,
title = "From state Islamic religious schools to Syariah and legal studies: Human resource in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in Malaysian higher education institutions",
abstract = "The present paper examines the importance of policy in enabling human resources, following the completion of university-level education, to be involved in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in syariah and legal studies in Malaysia.This paper argues that the human resources in the Islamic sector in Malaysia and academic entrepreneurship in syariah and legal studies are dependent on students from Islamic religious schools. Islamic religious secondary schools are usually administered either by the federal government, state governments or private institutions. According to the constitutional division of powers, education is a federal matter. Therefore, any educational institutions fall under the responsibility of the federal government, irrespective of the means of their establishment. However, state-administered Islamic religious secondary schools are considered to fall outside the purview of the federal government due to the fact that such institutions are administered by the state governments. This perceived conflict between state and federal authority in reading the Malaysian Constitution has resulted in the state Islamic religious secondary schools being virtually ignored by the federal government. This paper demonstrates the effects of the neglect of the Malaysian federal government regarding state Islamic religious secondary schools in relation to human resources in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship at Malaysian higher education institutions, especially in the area of syariah and legal studies. The current scenario in the Malaysian Muslim society will be taken into account in portraying the current need for students and graduates of Islamic studies to fulfill vacancies in the job market. The paper concludes with some suggestions to improve the development and management of human resources in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in the area of syariah and legal studies in Malaysia.",
keywords = "Academic entrepreneurship, Human resource, Legal studies, State islamic religious schools, Syariah",
author = "Nizamuddin Alias and Nurhafilah Musa",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "223--238",
journal = "Pertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities",
issn = "0128-7702",
publisher = "Universiti Putra Malaysia",
number = "January",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - From state Islamic religious schools to Syariah and legal studies

T2 - Human resource in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in Malaysian higher education institutions

AU - Alias, Nizamuddin

AU - Musa, Nurhafilah

PY - 2014/1/1

Y1 - 2014/1/1

N2 - The present paper examines the importance of policy in enabling human resources, following the completion of university-level education, to be involved in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in syariah and legal studies in Malaysia.This paper argues that the human resources in the Islamic sector in Malaysia and academic entrepreneurship in syariah and legal studies are dependent on students from Islamic religious schools. Islamic religious secondary schools are usually administered either by the federal government, state governments or private institutions. According to the constitutional division of powers, education is a federal matter. Therefore, any educational institutions fall under the responsibility of the federal government, irrespective of the means of their establishment. However, state-administered Islamic religious secondary schools are considered to fall outside the purview of the federal government due to the fact that such institutions are administered by the state governments. This perceived conflict between state and federal authority in reading the Malaysian Constitution has resulted in the state Islamic religious secondary schools being virtually ignored by the federal government. This paper demonstrates the effects of the neglect of the Malaysian federal government regarding state Islamic religious secondary schools in relation to human resources in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship at Malaysian higher education institutions, especially in the area of syariah and legal studies. The current scenario in the Malaysian Muslim society will be taken into account in portraying the current need for students and graduates of Islamic studies to fulfill vacancies in the job market. The paper concludes with some suggestions to improve the development and management of human resources in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in the area of syariah and legal studies in Malaysia.

AB - The present paper examines the importance of policy in enabling human resources, following the completion of university-level education, to be involved in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in syariah and legal studies in Malaysia.This paper argues that the human resources in the Islamic sector in Malaysia and academic entrepreneurship in syariah and legal studies are dependent on students from Islamic religious schools. Islamic religious secondary schools are usually administered either by the federal government, state governments or private institutions. According to the constitutional division of powers, education is a federal matter. Therefore, any educational institutions fall under the responsibility of the federal government, irrespective of the means of their establishment. However, state-administered Islamic religious secondary schools are considered to fall outside the purview of the federal government due to the fact that such institutions are administered by the state governments. This perceived conflict between state and federal authority in reading the Malaysian Constitution has resulted in the state Islamic religious secondary schools being virtually ignored by the federal government. This paper demonstrates the effects of the neglect of the Malaysian federal government regarding state Islamic religious secondary schools in relation to human resources in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship at Malaysian higher education institutions, especially in the area of syariah and legal studies. The current scenario in the Malaysian Muslim society will be taken into account in portraying the current need for students and graduates of Islamic studies to fulfill vacancies in the job market. The paper concludes with some suggestions to improve the development and management of human resources in the Islamic sector and academic entrepreneurship in the area of syariah and legal studies in Malaysia.

KW - Academic entrepreneurship

KW - Human resource

KW - Legal studies

KW - State islamic religious schools

KW - Syariah

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84942894308&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84942894308&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 22

SP - 223

EP - 238

JO - Pertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities

JF - Pertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities

SN - 0128-7702

IS - January

ER -