Freshwater scarcity and the theory of social adaptive capacity

Privatization and the role of the multilateral development banks and corporations in Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The article discusses the presence of TNCs, and development banks and corporations in managing and distributing scarce freshwater resources in Malaysia. The discussion centers around how these entities might have or have not been able to alleviate the problem of water scarcity. The discourse in this work focuses on freshwater scarcity and the theory of social adaptive capacity in Malaysia, amidst the privatization process which is manifested by the presence of transnational water corporations and multinational development banks. Adaptations are considered responses to risks associated with the interaction of environmental hazards such as water scarcity, and human vulnerability or social adaptive capacity. The global water situation has trickled down to countries like Malaysia where there is a growing freshwater crisis. This crisis has been slowly securitized because water scarcity is seen as the ultimate limit to development, prosperity, health and national security.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)65-82
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Third World Studies
Volume30
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2013

Fingerprint

privatization
Malaysia
corporation
bank
water
national security
environmental hazard
prosperity
vulnerability
discourse
interaction
health
resources

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Development
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

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abstract = "The article discusses the presence of TNCs, and development banks and corporations in managing and distributing scarce freshwater resources in Malaysia. The discussion centers around how these entities might have or have not been able to alleviate the problem of water scarcity. The discourse in this work focuses on freshwater scarcity and the theory of social adaptive capacity in Malaysia, amidst the privatization process which is manifested by the presence of transnational water corporations and multinational development banks. Adaptations are considered responses to risks associated with the interaction of environmental hazards such as water scarcity, and human vulnerability or social adaptive capacity. The global water situation has trickled down to countries like Malaysia where there is a growing freshwater crisis. This crisis has been slowly securitized because water scarcity is seen as the ultimate limit to development, prosperity, health and national security.",
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