Fragmentation of water policies in ASEAN: Potential role of the ASEAN community

Sufian Jusoh, Hayatunnisah Binti Sulaiman, Suzarika Binti Sahak, Karamjit Singh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Introduction The quest of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to become economies linked to global economic activities means there is high demand for water, either as a source of sanitation, for agriculture and industrial usage, and as a source of energy generation. The drive for industrialisation is motivating ASEAN as a whole to remain a competitive and attractive destination for foreign direct investment. On the other hand, the ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC) may be able to offer some solutions to any potential differences and conflicts between ASEAN Member States. The ASEAN was formed on 8 August 1967 by Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore and Thailand. ASEAN has since expanded to cover most of Southeast Asia including Brunei, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam. ASEAN is a large market, with 625 million people, 60 per cent of whom are youth, with a gross domestic product of USD 2.398 trillion. In relation to water resources, Cambodia, Lao PDR, Myanmar and Vietnam are riparian states to one of the largest river basins in the world, the Mekong River Basin. Singapore, on the other hand, relies on Malaysia for most of its water supply. ASEAN is a fast-growing region, with four different types of economies: the high income economies of Brunei and Singapore; upper-middle income economies of Malaysia and Thailand; the lower-middle income economies of Indonesia, Lao PDR, Philippines and Vietnam; and the low income economies of Cambodia and Myanmar. The formation of the ASEAN Community which includes the ASEAN Political-Security Community (APSC) and the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC) may have an impact on water policy in ASEAN Member States. This chapter discusses the source of water and water policies in the ASEAN Member States, which are divided into mainland states and island states. As ASEAN island states do not normally have any potential conflicts on water as they do not share water resources, the chapter will only focus on water sources and water policy of the ASEAN Member States in the mainland, apart from Singapore. The chapter then discusses water conflicts in ASEAN, commencing with the issues and conflicts in the Mekong River Basin, the issues between Malaysia and Singapore and the issues between two states in Malaysia, namely the State of Penang and the State of Kedah.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Regulation of the Global Water Services Market
PublisherCambridge University Press
Pages312-334
Number of pages23
ISBN (Electronic)9781316678442
ISBN (Print)9781107162860
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

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ASEAN
fragmentation
water
community
Singapore
Malaysia
economy
Laos
Myanmar
Cambodia
Vietnam
Brunei
river
income
Philippines
Thailand
Indonesia
conflict potential
gross domestic product
direct investment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Jusoh, S., Sulaiman, H. B., Sahak, S. B., & Singh, K. (2017). Fragmentation of water policies in ASEAN: Potential role of the ASEAN community. In The Regulation of the Global Water Services Market (pp. 312-334). Cambridge University Press. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316678442.014

Fragmentation of water policies in ASEAN : Potential role of the ASEAN community. / Jusoh, Sufian; Sulaiman, Hayatunnisah Binti; Sahak, Suzarika Binti; Singh, Karamjit.

The Regulation of the Global Water Services Market. Cambridge University Press, 2017. p. 312-334.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Jusoh, S, Sulaiman, HB, Sahak, SB & Singh, K 2017, Fragmentation of water policies in ASEAN: Potential role of the ASEAN community. in The Regulation of the Global Water Services Market. Cambridge University Press, pp. 312-334. https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316678442.014
Jusoh S, Sulaiman HB, Sahak SB, Singh K. Fragmentation of water policies in ASEAN: Potential role of the ASEAN community. In The Regulation of the Global Water Services Market. Cambridge University Press. 2017. p. 312-334 https://doi.org/10.1017/9781316678442.014
Jusoh, Sufian ; Sulaiman, Hayatunnisah Binti ; Sahak, Suzarika Binti ; Singh, Karamjit. / Fragmentation of water policies in ASEAN : Potential role of the ASEAN community. The Regulation of the Global Water Services Market. Cambridge University Press, 2017. pp. 312-334
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