Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) among office workers in an academic institution, Malaysia – associations with asthma, allergies and office environment

Fang Lee Lim, Zailina Hashim, Salmiah Md Said, Leslie Thian Lung Than, Jamal Hisham Hashim, Dan Norbäck

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Objective: There are few studies on fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and respiratory symptoms among adults in tropical areas. The aim was to study associations between FeNO and selected personal factors, respiratory symptoms, allergies, office characteristics and indoor office exposures among office workers (n = 460) from a university in Malaysia. Methods: Information on health was collected by a questionnaire, skin prick test and FeNO measurement. Temperature, relative air humidity, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were measured in the offices. Settled dust was vacuumed in the offices and analyzed for endotoxin, (1,3)-β-glucan and house dust mites allergens, namely Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p 1) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1). Two-level linear mixed models and multiple logistic regression were used to analyze the associations. Results: One-fourth (25.9%) of the office workers had elevated FeNO level (≥25 ppb) and 61.5% had HDM, cat, seafood or pollen allergy. Male gender (p < 0.001), current smoking (p = 0.037), height (p < 0.001) and atopy (p < 0.001) were associated with FeNO. The amount of vacuumed dust was associated with FeNO among atopic subjects (p = 0.009). Asthma and rhinitis symptoms were associated with FeNO (p < 0.05), especially among atopic subjects. In particular, a combination of atopy and elevated FeNO were associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma (p < 0.001), rhinitis (p < 0.001) and airway symptoms last 12 months (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Gender, smoking, height and atopy are important risk factors for elevated FeNO levels. A combination of allergy testing and FeNO measurement could be useful in respiratory illness epidemiology studies and patient investigations in tropical areas.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalJournal of Asthma
    DOIs
    Publication statusAccepted/In press - 21 Aug 2015

    Fingerprint

    Malaysia
    Hypersensitivity
    Nitric Oxide
    Asthma
    Rhinitis
    Dust
    Smoking
    Dermatophagoides farinae
    Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus
    Dermatophagoides Antigens
    Seafood
    Seasonal Allergic Rhinitis
    Glucans
    Carbon Monoxide
    Humidity
    Skin Tests
    Endotoxins
    Carbon Dioxide
    Linear Models
    Epidemiology

    Keywords

    • Adults
    • allergy
    • Malaysia
    • office
    • respiratory symptoms
    • rhinitis
    • tropical areas

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
    • Immunology and Allergy
    • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

    Cite this

    Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) among office workers in an academic institution, Malaysia – associations with asthma, allergies and office environment. / Lim, Fang Lee; Hashim, Zailina; Md Said, Salmiah; Than, Leslie Thian Lung; Hashim, Jamal Hisham; Norbäck, Dan.

    In: Journal of Asthma, 21.08.2015.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Lim, Fang Lee ; Hashim, Zailina ; Md Said, Salmiah ; Than, Leslie Thian Lung ; Hashim, Jamal Hisham ; Norbäck, Dan. / Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) among office workers in an academic institution, Malaysia – associations with asthma, allergies and office environment. In: Journal of Asthma. 2015.
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    abstract = "Objective: There are few studies on fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and respiratory symptoms among adults in tropical areas. The aim was to study associations between FeNO and selected personal factors, respiratory symptoms, allergies, office characteristics and indoor office exposures among office workers (n = 460) from a university in Malaysia. Methods: Information on health was collected by a questionnaire, skin prick test and FeNO measurement. Temperature, relative air humidity, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were measured in the offices. Settled dust was vacuumed in the offices and analyzed for endotoxin, (1,3)-β-glucan and house dust mites allergens, namely Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p 1) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1). Two-level linear mixed models and multiple logistic regression were used to analyze the associations. Results: One-fourth (25.9{\%}) of the office workers had elevated FeNO level (≥25 ppb) and 61.5{\%} had HDM, cat, seafood or pollen allergy. Male gender (p < 0.001), current smoking (p = 0.037), height (p < 0.001) and atopy (p < 0.001) were associated with FeNO. The amount of vacuumed dust was associated with FeNO among atopic subjects (p = 0.009). Asthma and rhinitis symptoms were associated with FeNO (p < 0.05), especially among atopic subjects. In particular, a combination of atopy and elevated FeNO were associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma (p < 0.001), rhinitis (p < 0.001) and airway symptoms last 12 months (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Gender, smoking, height and atopy are important risk factors for elevated FeNO levels. A combination of allergy testing and FeNO measurement could be useful in respiratory illness epidemiology studies and patient investigations in tropical areas.",
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    AU - Than, Leslie Thian Lung

    AU - Hashim, Jamal Hisham

    AU - Norbäck, Dan

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    N2 - Objective: There are few studies on fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and respiratory symptoms among adults in tropical areas. The aim was to study associations between FeNO and selected personal factors, respiratory symptoms, allergies, office characteristics and indoor office exposures among office workers (n = 460) from a university in Malaysia. Methods: Information on health was collected by a questionnaire, skin prick test and FeNO measurement. Temperature, relative air humidity, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were measured in the offices. Settled dust was vacuumed in the offices and analyzed for endotoxin, (1,3)-β-glucan and house dust mites allergens, namely Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p 1) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1). Two-level linear mixed models and multiple logistic regression were used to analyze the associations. Results: One-fourth (25.9%) of the office workers had elevated FeNO level (≥25 ppb) and 61.5% had HDM, cat, seafood or pollen allergy. Male gender (p < 0.001), current smoking (p = 0.037), height (p < 0.001) and atopy (p < 0.001) were associated with FeNO. The amount of vacuumed dust was associated with FeNO among atopic subjects (p = 0.009). Asthma and rhinitis symptoms were associated with FeNO (p < 0.05), especially among atopic subjects. In particular, a combination of atopy and elevated FeNO were associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma (p < 0.001), rhinitis (p < 0.001) and airway symptoms last 12 months (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Gender, smoking, height and atopy are important risk factors for elevated FeNO levels. A combination of allergy testing and FeNO measurement could be useful in respiratory illness epidemiology studies and patient investigations in tropical areas.

    AB - Objective: There are few studies on fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and respiratory symptoms among adults in tropical areas. The aim was to study associations between FeNO and selected personal factors, respiratory symptoms, allergies, office characteristics and indoor office exposures among office workers (n = 460) from a university in Malaysia. Methods: Information on health was collected by a questionnaire, skin prick test and FeNO measurement. Temperature, relative air humidity, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide were measured in the offices. Settled dust was vacuumed in the offices and analyzed for endotoxin, (1,3)-β-glucan and house dust mites allergens, namely Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p 1) and Dermatophagoides farinae (Der f 1). Two-level linear mixed models and multiple logistic regression were used to analyze the associations. Results: One-fourth (25.9%) of the office workers had elevated FeNO level (≥25 ppb) and 61.5% had HDM, cat, seafood or pollen allergy. Male gender (p < 0.001), current smoking (p = 0.037), height (p < 0.001) and atopy (p < 0.001) were associated with FeNO. The amount of vacuumed dust was associated with FeNO among atopic subjects (p = 0.009). Asthma and rhinitis symptoms were associated with FeNO (p < 0.05), especially among atopic subjects. In particular, a combination of atopy and elevated FeNO were associated with doctor-diagnosed asthma (p < 0.001), rhinitis (p < 0.001) and airway symptoms last 12 months (p < 0.001). Conclusion: Gender, smoking, height and atopy are important risk factors for elevated FeNO levels. A combination of allergy testing and FeNO measurement could be useful in respiratory illness epidemiology studies and patient investigations in tropical areas.

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    KW - Malaysia

    KW - office

    KW - respiratory symptoms

    KW - rhinitis

    KW - tropical areas

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