Food intakes and preferences of hospitalised geriatric patients

Suzana Shahar, Kan Yin Chee, Wan Chak Pa Wan Chik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: A cross sectional survey was carried out on 120 hospitalised geriatric patients aged 60 and above in Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur to investigate their nutrient intakes and food preferences. Methods: Food intakes were recorded using a one day weighed method and diet recall. Food preferences were determined using a five point hedonic score. Food wastages and factors affecting dietary adequacy were also investigated. Results: The findings indicated that the mean intakes of energy and all nutrients investigated except for vitamin C and fluid were below the individual requirement for energy, protein and fluid, and the Malaysian Recommendation of Dietary Allowances (RDA) for calcium, iron, vitamin A, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin and acid ascorbic. In general, subjects preferred vegetables, fruits and beans to red meat, milk and dairy products. There was a trend of women to have a higher percentage for food wastage. Females, diabetic patients, subjects who did not take snacks and subjects who were taking hospital food only, were more likely to consume an inadequate diet (p < 0.05 for all values). Conclusions: Food service system in hospital should consider the food preferences among geriatric patients in order to improve the nutrient intake. In addition, the preparation of food most likely to be rejected such as meat, milk and dairy products need some improvements to increase the acceptance of these foods among geriatric patients. This is important because these foods are good sources of energy, protein and micronutrients that can promote recovery from disease or illness.

Original languageEnglish
Article number3
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalBMC Geriatrics
Volume2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Aug 2002

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Food Preferences
Geriatrics
Eating
Food
Meat Products
Dairy Products
Ascorbic Acid
Milk
Food Services
Diet
Dietary Calcium
Snacks
Pleasure
Riboflavin
Micronutrients
Niacin
Thiamine
Malaysia
Energy Intake
Vitamin A

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Food intakes and preferences of hospitalised geriatric patients. / Shahar, Suzana; Chee, Kan Yin; Chik, Wan Chak Pa Wan.

In: BMC Geriatrics, Vol. 2, 3, 06.08.2002, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shahar, Suzana ; Chee, Kan Yin ; Chik, Wan Chak Pa Wan. / Food intakes and preferences of hospitalised geriatric patients. In: BMC Geriatrics. 2002 ; Vol. 2. pp. 1-6.
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