Fly colonization and carcass decomposition in a high-rise building in Malaysia

Syamsa Rizal Abdullah, Baharudin Omar, Ahmad Firdaus Mohd Salleh, Mohamed Abdullah Marwi, Hidayatul Fathi Othman, Shahrom Abd Wahid

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: Given the increasing number of abandoned dead bodies found in high-rise buildings in Malaysia, a study was conducted to investigate the decomposition stages of the carcasses and the distribution of forensically important flies in a high-rise building in Malaysia. Methods: Two dead monkeys were exposed simultaneously, one was placed at the top floor (40-meter height) of a building in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and the other was exposed on the open ground outside the building to determine fly species present in that area. Results: Both carcasses experienced five stages of decomposition (fresh, bloated, active decay, advanced decay and dry remains), but carcass placed at the top floor required an extremely longer time to complete the decomposition process. The top floor carcasses were infested with only three types of Dipterans: Megaselia scalaris, Synthesiomyia nudiseta and sarcophagid fly. As comparison, the outdoor carcasses were infested by huge numbers of a variety of common corpse-visiting flies: Chrysomya megacephala, Achoetandrus rufifacies, sarcophagid fly, Hemipyrellia ligurriens, Hydrotaea spinigera, Lucilia cuprina, Musca sorbens and M. scalaris. Conclusion: The above findings highlighted the importance of better understanding of fly behaviour and distribution in assisting forensic investigations, especially when death occurs at high-rise buildings.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94-99
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Medical Journal
Volume23
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

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Malaysia
Diptera
Cadaver
Haplorhini

Keywords

  • Flies
  • Forensic entomology
  • High-rise building
  • Malaysia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Fly colonization and carcass decomposition in a high-rise building in Malaysia. / Abdullah, Syamsa Rizal; Omar, Baharudin; Salleh, Ahmad Firdaus Mohd; Marwi, Mohamed Abdullah; Othman, Hidayatul Fathi; Abd Wahid, Shahrom.

In: International Medical Journal, Vol. 23, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 94-99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abdullah, Syamsa Rizal ; Omar, Baharudin ; Salleh, Ahmad Firdaus Mohd ; Marwi, Mohamed Abdullah ; Othman, Hidayatul Fathi ; Abd Wahid, Shahrom. / Fly colonization and carcass decomposition in a high-rise building in Malaysia. In: International Medical Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 94-99.
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