Fluidized Bed Dryers - Recent Advances

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although industrial fluidized bed dryers have been used successfully for the drying of wet solid particles for many years, the development of industrial fluidized bed dryers for any particular application is fraught with difficulties such as scaling-up, poor fluidization and non-uniform product quality. Scaling-up is the major problem and there are very few good, reliable theoretical models that can replace the expensive laboratory work and pilot-plant trials. This problem is mainly due to the different behavior of bubbles and mixing regimes in fluidized bed dryers of different size. Simple transformation of laboratory batch drying data to continuous back-mixed dryers using the residence time distribution of the solids is insufficient to account for the complex flow and heat and mass transfer phenomena occurring in the bed. Although time scaling using temperature driving forces and solids mass flux for the same change in moisture content in the batch and continuous dryers has been successful in predicting moisture content profiles in the continuous dryer at the constant rate period, it does not take into account solid mixing. Two-phase Davidson-Harrison models have been used in modeling of the continuous back-mixed dryer with various degrees of success. On the other hand, the three-phase Kunii-Levenspiel model is seldom used in modeling fluidized bed dryers because it is too complex to handle. A combination of multi-phase models and residence time distribution could improve predicting power for back-mixed dryers because this combination takes into account both the bubbles and solid mixing phenomena. Incremental models were widely used to model continuous plug flow fluidized bed dryers, but the cross-flow of drying medium has not been sufficiently modeled except by the author. In some incremental models, axial dispersion is modeled using the Peclet number, Pe. A combination of an incremental model with an axial dispersion and cross-flow model of drying medium would improve predicting power. Poor fluidization of Geldart group C particles could be improved by the assistance of external means such as vibration, agitation, rotation and centrifugation. Both vibrated and agitated fluidized bed dryers have been successfully used in industry, but rotating or centrifugal fluidized bed dryers are still not available for industrial use.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)403-418
Number of pages16
JournalAdvanced Powder Technology
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

Fingerprint

Fluidized beds
Drying
Residence time distribution
Fluidization
Moisture
Mass transfer
Peclet number
Centrifugation
Pilot plants
Heat transfer

Keywords

  • agitated fluidized bed
  • centrifugal fluidized bed
  • cross flow
  • Fluidized bed
  • modeling
  • scaling up
  • vibrating fluidized bed

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Fluidized Bed Dryers - Recent Advances. / Wan Daud, Wan Ramli.

In: Advanced Powder Technology, Vol. 19, No. 5, 2008, p. 403-418.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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