Floating fields tree and plant production

Rodney Sidloski, Wayan Suparta

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

The challenge of lowering tree production costs to address depletion in global forest cover and timber supply is addressed. Research was driven by the desire to develop a system of tree production so inexpensive that trees could be produced by government and private nurseries at inconsequential cost for free or low cost distribution for mass tree planting to help world-wide tree supply catch up to demand. The research goal was to lower to two pennies the cost of tree production during the critical 90 day period after a cutting or bare root seedling is planted in a nursery to the time the plant grows into a field ready seedling. The research followed rigorous objectives to achieve vast reduction in infrastructure, maintenance, chemicals, irrigation technology and labour to create high-volume, high-density outdoor and indoor tree production. Costs during the 'critical ninety days' were brought down to near zero in some trials. Key to this achievement was proving the hypothesis that sub-irrigated plant production is possible by placing tree cuttings and bare root seedlings into buoyant planting blocks floated in a wide variety of outdoor water bodies and indoor water pans. The system also proved until for production of a wide range of forbs, vascular plants, grasses and select vegetables. The extreme water saving characteristic of the floating fields system was a subsequent discovery not hypothesized. Successful floating field production of trees, grasses, vegetables and a wide range of aquatic and dryland plants suggest that sub-irrigation in general and floating fields in particular represents a major breakthrough in agriculture. Larger implications of this discovery are expected to show dramatic lessening of the cost of plant production worldwide with desired consequences for the planet including but not limited to improved forest cover, greater industrial timber supply, and improved food security.

Original languageEnglish
Article number012116
JournalIOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science
Volume169
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018
Externally publishedYes
Event9th IGRSM International Conference and Exhibition on Geospatial and Remote Sensing: Geospatial Enablement, IGRSM 2018 - Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Duration: 24 Apr 201825 Apr 2018

Fingerprint

cost
seedling
forest cover
vegetable
timber
grass
irrigation
tree planting
plant production
production cost
food security
vascular plant
planet
labor
infrastructure
agriculture
water
cutting (process)
chemical
demand

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Floating fields tree and plant production. / Sidloski, Rodney; Suparta, Wayan.

In: IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science, Vol. 169, No. 1, 012116, 01.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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