Finite element analysis of the wrist in stroke patients: the effects of hand grip

Muhammad Hanif Ramlee, Gan Kok Beng, Nazri Bajuri, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul Kadir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The provision of the most suitable rehabilitation treatment for stroke patient remains an ongoing challenge for clinicians. Fully understanding the pathomechanics of the upper limb will allow doctors to assist patients with physiotherapy treatment that will aid in full arm recovery. A biomechanical study was therefore conducted using the finite element (FE) method. A three-dimensional (3D) model of the human wrist was reconstructed using computed tomography (CT)-scanned images. A stroke model was constructed based on pathological problems, i.e. bone density reductions, cartilage wane, and spasticity. The cartilages were reconstructed as per the articulation shapes in the joint, while the ligaments were modelled using linear links. The hand grip condition was mimicked, and the resulting biomechanical characteristics of the stroke and healthy models were compared. Due to the lower thickness of the cartilages, the stroke model reported a higher contact pressure (305 MPa), specifically at the MC1-trapezium. Contrarily, a healthy model reported a contact pressure of 228 MPa. In the context of wrist extension and displacement, the stroke model (0.68° and 5.54 mm, respectively) reported a lower magnitude than the healthy model (0.98° and 9.43 mm, respectively), which agrees with previously reported works. It was therefore concluded that clinicians should take extra care in rehabilitation treatment of wrist movement in order to prevent the occurrence of other complications. [Figure not available: see fulltext.]

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-11
Number of pages11
JournalMedical and Biological Engineering and Computing
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 5 Dec 2017

Fingerprint

Finite element method
Cartilage
Patient rehabilitation
Physical therapy
Ligaments
Tomography
Bone
Recovery

Keywords

  • Cartilage
  • Finite element analysis
  • Load transmission
  • Range of motion
  • Rehabilitation
  • Stroke
  • Upper limb
  • Wrist biomechanics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Computer Science Applications

Cite this

Finite element analysis of the wrist in stroke patients : the effects of hand grip. / Ramlee, Muhammad Hanif; Kok Beng, Gan; Bajuri, Nazri; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq.

In: Medical and Biological Engineering and Computing, 05.12.2017, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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