Feedback from Malaysian pharmacists who underwent a 3-year period of compulsory service with the government

Ong Aik Liang, Thomas Paraidathathu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    2 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Since 2004, it is mandatory for all new pharmacy graduates in Malaysia to serve the government for a period of 4 years, before they are free to work as registered pharmacists in a sector of their choice, either public or private. With the enactment of this compulsory service, the government hoped to fill and retain the many positions for pharmacists in the Ministry of Health that had been vacant for a number of years. A survey, using a questionnaire, was carried out to find out the views of the first batch of pharmacists who had completed or were just completing their compulsory service. The total number of pharmacists who participated in the survey was 175. More than 85% of the respondents were female. Graduates from a private university formed the largest group (39%). Overall, 76% were satisfied with the compulsory service and almost 90% of the respondents felt that the compulsory service had played an important role in developing their professional skills. About 68% of them planned to continue working with the government. Among the reasons for wanting to remain in the public sector were job security, benefits provided by the government and the ability to utilize their professional skills. Among those who did not plan to remain in government service, the most frequent reasons given were poor chances of career development and lack of prospects for promotion. Overall, the compulsory service appears to have met one of its goals of retaining the services of pharmacists in the public sector. Concerns about career development and prospects for promotion should be addressed. Recently announced changes in the career structure and promotion scheme for pharmacists will address some of these concerns.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)159-167
    Number of pages9
    JournalThai Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
    Volume35
    Issue number4
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2011

    Fingerprint

    Pharmacists
    Public Sector
    Malaysia
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Health

    Keywords

    • Career prospects
    • Compulsory service
    • Job satisfaction
    • Pharmacists
    • Pharmacy graduates

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Pharmaceutical Science
    • Pharmacology

    Cite this

    Feedback from Malaysian pharmacists who underwent a 3-year period of compulsory service with the government. / Liang, Ong Aik; Paraidathathu, Thomas.

    In: Thai Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Vol. 35, No. 4, 10.2011, p. 159-167.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    @article{c760301bad604b4a90f16155665a2365,
    title = "Feedback from Malaysian pharmacists who underwent a 3-year period of compulsory service with the government",
    abstract = "Since 2004, it is mandatory for all new pharmacy graduates in Malaysia to serve the government for a period of 4 years, before they are free to work as registered pharmacists in a sector of their choice, either public or private. With the enactment of this compulsory service, the government hoped to fill and retain the many positions for pharmacists in the Ministry of Health that had been vacant for a number of years. A survey, using a questionnaire, was carried out to find out the views of the first batch of pharmacists who had completed or were just completing their compulsory service. The total number of pharmacists who participated in the survey was 175. More than 85{\%} of the respondents were female. Graduates from a private university formed the largest group (39{\%}). Overall, 76{\%} were satisfied with the compulsory service and almost 90{\%} of the respondents felt that the compulsory service had played an important role in developing their professional skills. About 68{\%} of them planned to continue working with the government. Among the reasons for wanting to remain in the public sector were job security, benefits provided by the government and the ability to utilize their professional skills. Among those who did not plan to remain in government service, the most frequent reasons given were poor chances of career development and lack of prospects for promotion. Overall, the compulsory service appears to have met one of its goals of retaining the services of pharmacists in the public sector. Concerns about career development and prospects for promotion should be addressed. Recently announced changes in the career structure and promotion scheme for pharmacists will address some of these concerns.",
    keywords = "Career prospects, Compulsory service, Job satisfaction, Pharmacists, Pharmacy graduates",
    author = "Liang, {Ong Aik} and Thomas Paraidathathu",
    year = "2011",
    month = "10",
    language = "English",
    volume = "35",
    pages = "159--167",
    journal = "Thai Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences",
    issn = "0125-4685",
    publisher = "Thai Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences",
    number = "4",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Feedback from Malaysian pharmacists who underwent a 3-year period of compulsory service with the government

    AU - Liang, Ong Aik

    AU - Paraidathathu, Thomas

    PY - 2011/10

    Y1 - 2011/10

    N2 - Since 2004, it is mandatory for all new pharmacy graduates in Malaysia to serve the government for a period of 4 years, before they are free to work as registered pharmacists in a sector of their choice, either public or private. With the enactment of this compulsory service, the government hoped to fill and retain the many positions for pharmacists in the Ministry of Health that had been vacant for a number of years. A survey, using a questionnaire, was carried out to find out the views of the first batch of pharmacists who had completed or were just completing their compulsory service. The total number of pharmacists who participated in the survey was 175. More than 85% of the respondents were female. Graduates from a private university formed the largest group (39%). Overall, 76% were satisfied with the compulsory service and almost 90% of the respondents felt that the compulsory service had played an important role in developing their professional skills. About 68% of them planned to continue working with the government. Among the reasons for wanting to remain in the public sector were job security, benefits provided by the government and the ability to utilize their professional skills. Among those who did not plan to remain in government service, the most frequent reasons given were poor chances of career development and lack of prospects for promotion. Overall, the compulsory service appears to have met one of its goals of retaining the services of pharmacists in the public sector. Concerns about career development and prospects for promotion should be addressed. Recently announced changes in the career structure and promotion scheme for pharmacists will address some of these concerns.

    AB - Since 2004, it is mandatory for all new pharmacy graduates in Malaysia to serve the government for a period of 4 years, before they are free to work as registered pharmacists in a sector of their choice, either public or private. With the enactment of this compulsory service, the government hoped to fill and retain the many positions for pharmacists in the Ministry of Health that had been vacant for a number of years. A survey, using a questionnaire, was carried out to find out the views of the first batch of pharmacists who had completed or were just completing their compulsory service. The total number of pharmacists who participated in the survey was 175. More than 85% of the respondents were female. Graduates from a private university formed the largest group (39%). Overall, 76% were satisfied with the compulsory service and almost 90% of the respondents felt that the compulsory service had played an important role in developing their professional skills. About 68% of them planned to continue working with the government. Among the reasons for wanting to remain in the public sector were job security, benefits provided by the government and the ability to utilize their professional skills. Among those who did not plan to remain in government service, the most frequent reasons given were poor chances of career development and lack of prospects for promotion. Overall, the compulsory service appears to have met one of its goals of retaining the services of pharmacists in the public sector. Concerns about career development and prospects for promotion should be addressed. Recently announced changes in the career structure and promotion scheme for pharmacists will address some of these concerns.

    KW - Career prospects

    KW - Compulsory service

    KW - Job satisfaction

    KW - Pharmacists

    KW - Pharmacy graduates

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84857768893&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84857768893&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    M3 - Article

    AN - SCOPUS:84857768893

    VL - 35

    SP - 159

    EP - 167

    JO - Thai Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    JF - Thai Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences

    SN - 0125-4685

    IS - 4

    ER -