Factors associated with mouthguard use and discontinuation among rugby players in Malaysia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims: To assess rugby players' preferences for using a mouthguard and to determine the factors contributing to the use and discontinuation of a mouthguard. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in two rugby tournaments from 2009 to 2010. Samples were selected by convenience sampling. Participants were required to complete a self-administered questionnaire, which inquired about awareness and pattern of mouthguard use, as well as reasons if discontinued. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 456 participants, with an estimated response rate of 77.8%. All participants were male (mean age = 22.73, SD = 3.98). Median duration of playing was 6 years, and median frequency was 6 h per week. Overall mouthguard use was low (31.1%, n = 142), especially for custom-fitted mouthguard (1.8%, n = 8), followed by stock mouthguard (7.7%, n = 35). Boil-and-bite type was most commonly used (21.1%, n = 96). Of those who wore a mouthguard before, only 28% continued using it. The discontinuation rate for each type was as follows: stock, 57.1% (P = 0.032); boil-and-bite, 80.2% (P = 0.002); and custom, 37.5% (P = 0.04). Age was a significant factor for mouthguard use (P = 0.007, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.17). Breathing disturbance (OR = 3.36, 95% CI = 1.17-9.72) and general discomfort (OR = 3.71, 95% CI = 1.68-8.20) were significant factors in discontinuing mouthguard use. Conclusions: The use of mouthguard was low among rugby players. Custom-made was the least worn type, possibly due to limited availability. The use of mouthguard increased slightly with age but was discouraged by breathing interference and general discomfort. Therefore, preventive effort should focus on early education and reinforcement, as well as on the improvement of wearability and accessibility.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)461-467
Number of pages7
JournalDental Traumatology
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2014

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Football
Malaysia
Furunculosis
Bites and Stings
Respiration
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Athletic injuries
  • Dental trauma
  • Mouth protectors
  • Mouthguard
  • Preventive dentistry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oral Surgery

Cite this

Factors associated with mouthguard use and discontinuation among rugby players in Malaysia. / Liew, Kia Cheen Amy; Abdullah, Dalia; Wan Ahmad, Wan Noorina; Khoo, Selina.

In: Dental Traumatology, Vol. 30, No. 6, 01.12.2014, p. 461-467.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Aims: To assess rugby players' preferences for using a mouthguard and to determine the factors contributing to the use and discontinuation of a mouthguard. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in two rugby tournaments from 2009 to 2010. Samples were selected by convenience sampling. Participants were required to complete a self-administered questionnaire, which inquired about awareness and pattern of mouthguard use, as well as reasons if discontinued. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 456 participants, with an estimated response rate of 77.8{\%}. All participants were male (mean age = 22.73, SD = 3.98). Median duration of playing was 6 years, and median frequency was 6 h per week. Overall mouthguard use was low (31.1{\%}, n = 142), especially for custom-fitted mouthguard (1.8{\%}, n = 8), followed by stock mouthguard (7.7{\%}, n = 35). Boil-and-bite type was most commonly used (21.1{\%}, n = 96). Of those who wore a mouthguard before, only 28{\%} continued using it. The discontinuation rate for each type was as follows: stock, 57.1{\%} (P = 0.032); boil-and-bite, 80.2{\%} (P = 0.002); and custom, 37.5{\%} (P = 0.04). Age was a significant factor for mouthguard use (P = 0.007, OR = 1.10, 95{\%} CI = 1.03-1.17). Breathing disturbance (OR = 3.36, 95{\%} CI = 1.17-9.72) and general discomfort (OR = 3.71, 95{\%} CI = 1.68-8.20) were significant factors in discontinuing mouthguard use. Conclusions: The use of mouthguard was low among rugby players. Custom-made was the least worn type, possibly due to limited availability. The use of mouthguard increased slightly with age but was discouraged by breathing interference and general discomfort. Therefore, preventive effort should focus on early education and reinforcement, as well as on the improvement of wearability and accessibility.",
keywords = "Athletic injuries, Dental trauma, Mouth protectors, Mouthguard, Preventive dentistry",
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AU - Wan Ahmad, Wan Noorina

AU - Khoo, Selina

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N2 - Aims: To assess rugby players' preferences for using a mouthguard and to determine the factors contributing to the use and discontinuation of a mouthguard. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in two rugby tournaments from 2009 to 2010. Samples were selected by convenience sampling. Participants were required to complete a self-administered questionnaire, which inquired about awareness and pattern of mouthguard use, as well as reasons if discontinued. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 456 participants, with an estimated response rate of 77.8%. All participants were male (mean age = 22.73, SD = 3.98). Median duration of playing was 6 years, and median frequency was 6 h per week. Overall mouthguard use was low (31.1%, n = 142), especially for custom-fitted mouthguard (1.8%, n = 8), followed by stock mouthguard (7.7%, n = 35). Boil-and-bite type was most commonly used (21.1%, n = 96). Of those who wore a mouthguard before, only 28% continued using it. The discontinuation rate for each type was as follows: stock, 57.1% (P = 0.032); boil-and-bite, 80.2% (P = 0.002); and custom, 37.5% (P = 0.04). Age was a significant factor for mouthguard use (P = 0.007, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.17). Breathing disturbance (OR = 3.36, 95% CI = 1.17-9.72) and general discomfort (OR = 3.71, 95% CI = 1.68-8.20) were significant factors in discontinuing mouthguard use. Conclusions: The use of mouthguard was low among rugby players. Custom-made was the least worn type, possibly due to limited availability. The use of mouthguard increased slightly with age but was discouraged by breathing interference and general discomfort. Therefore, preventive effort should focus on early education and reinforcement, as well as on the improvement of wearability and accessibility.

AB - Aims: To assess rugby players' preferences for using a mouthguard and to determine the factors contributing to the use and discontinuation of a mouthguard. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in two rugby tournaments from 2009 to 2010. Samples were selected by convenience sampling. Participants were required to complete a self-administered questionnaire, which inquired about awareness and pattern of mouthguard use, as well as reasons if discontinued. Results: Completed questionnaires were returned by 456 participants, with an estimated response rate of 77.8%. All participants were male (mean age = 22.73, SD = 3.98). Median duration of playing was 6 years, and median frequency was 6 h per week. Overall mouthguard use was low (31.1%, n = 142), especially for custom-fitted mouthguard (1.8%, n = 8), followed by stock mouthguard (7.7%, n = 35). Boil-and-bite type was most commonly used (21.1%, n = 96). Of those who wore a mouthguard before, only 28% continued using it. The discontinuation rate for each type was as follows: stock, 57.1% (P = 0.032); boil-and-bite, 80.2% (P = 0.002); and custom, 37.5% (P = 0.04). Age was a significant factor for mouthguard use (P = 0.007, OR = 1.10, 95% CI = 1.03-1.17). Breathing disturbance (OR = 3.36, 95% CI = 1.17-9.72) and general discomfort (OR = 3.71, 95% CI = 1.68-8.20) were significant factors in discontinuing mouthguard use. Conclusions: The use of mouthguard was low among rugby players. Custom-made was the least worn type, possibly due to limited availability. The use of mouthguard increased slightly with age but was discouraged by breathing interference and general discomfort. Therefore, preventive effort should focus on early education and reinforcement, as well as on the improvement of wearability and accessibility.

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