Extracting respiratory motion from 4D MRI using organ-wise registration

Ashrani Aizzuddin Abd Rahni, Rhodri Smith, Emma Lewis, Kevin Wells

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nuclear Medicine (NM) imaging serves as a powerful diagnostic tool for imaging of biochemical and physiological processes in vivo. The degradation in spatial image resolution caused by the often irregular respiratory motion must be corrected to achieve high resolution imaging. In order perform motion correction more accurately, it is proposed that patient motion obtained from 4D MRI can be used to analyse respiratory motion. To extract motion from the dynamic MRI dataset an organ wise intensity based affine registration framework is proposed and evaluated. Comparison of the resultant motion obtained within selected organs is made against an open source free form deformation algorithm. For validation, the correlation of the results of both techniques to a previous study of motion in 20 patients is found. Organwise affine registration correlates very well (r = 0:9) with a previous study (Segars et al., 2007)1 whilst free form deformation shows little correlation (r = 0:3). This increases the confidence of the organ wise affine registration framework being an effective tool to extract motion from dynamic anatomical datasets.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
Volume8669
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
EventMedical Imaging 2013: Image Processing - Lake Buena Vista, FL
Duration: 10 Feb 201312 Feb 2013

Other

OtherMedical Imaging 2013: Image Processing
CityLake Buena Vista, FL
Period10/2/1312/2/13

Fingerprint

organs
Magnetic resonance imaging
Imaging techniques
Nuclear medicine
Image resolution
Degradation
Biochemical Phenomena
Physiological Phenomena
nuclear medicine
Nuclear Medicine
image resolution
Diagnostic Imaging
confidence
spatial resolution
degradation
high resolution

Keywords

  • 4D MRI
  • Registration
  • Respiratory motion
  • Segmentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Biomaterials
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

Cite this

Abd Rahni, A. A., Smith, R., Lewis, E., & Wells, K. (2013). Extracting respiratory motion from 4D MRI using organ-wise registration. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE (Vol. 8669). [866930] https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2006861

Extracting respiratory motion from 4D MRI using organ-wise registration. / Abd Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin; Smith, Rhodri; Lewis, Emma; Wells, Kevin.

Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8669 2013. 866930.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abd Rahni, AA, Smith, R, Lewis, E & Wells, K 2013, Extracting respiratory motion from 4D MRI using organ-wise registration. in Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. vol. 8669, 866930, Medical Imaging 2013: Image Processing, Lake Buena Vista, FL, 10/2/13. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2006861
Abd Rahni AA, Smith R, Lewis E, Wells K. Extracting respiratory motion from 4D MRI using organ-wise registration. In Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8669. 2013. 866930 https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2006861
Abd Rahni, Ashrani Aizzuddin ; Smith, Rhodri ; Lewis, Emma ; Wells, Kevin. / Extracting respiratory motion from 4D MRI using organ-wise registration. Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE. Vol. 8669 2013.
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