Exploring views on long term rehabilitation for people with stroke in a developing country: Findings from focus group discussions

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13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The importance of long term rehabilitation for people with stroke is increasingly evident, yet it is not known whether such services can be materialised in countries with limited community resources. In this study, we explored the perception of rehabilitation professionals and people with stroke towards long term stroke rehabilitation services and potential approaches to enable provision of these services. Views from providers and users are important in ensuring whatever strategies developed for long term stroke rehabilitations are feasible and acceptable. Methods. Focus group discussions were conducted involving 15 rehabilitation professionals and eight long term stroke survivors. All recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the principles of qualitative research. Results: Both groups agreed that people with stroke may benefit from more rehabilitation compared to the amount of rehabilitation services presently provided. Views regarding the unavailability of long term rehabilitation services due to multi-factorial barriers were recognised. The groups also highlighted the urgent need for the establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres. Family-assisted home therapy was viewed as a potential approach to continued rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors, given careful planning to overcome several family-related issues. Conclusions: Barriers to the provision of long term stroke rehabilitation services are multi-factorial. Establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres and training family members to conduct home-based therapy are two potential strategies to enable the continuation of rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors.

Original languageEnglish
Article number118
JournalBMC Health Services Research
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Mar 2014

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Focus Groups
Developing Countries
Rehabilitation
Stroke
Survivors
Rehabilitation Centers
Qualitative Research
Stroke Rehabilitation
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Family-assisted therapy
  • Focus groups
  • Rehabilitation
  • Stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Policy
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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title = "Exploring views on long term rehabilitation for people with stroke in a developing country: Findings from focus group discussions",
abstract = "The importance of long term rehabilitation for people with stroke is increasingly evident, yet it is not known whether such services can be materialised in countries with limited community resources. In this study, we explored the perception of rehabilitation professionals and people with stroke towards long term stroke rehabilitation services and potential approaches to enable provision of these services. Views from providers and users are important in ensuring whatever strategies developed for long term stroke rehabilitations are feasible and acceptable. Methods. Focus group discussions were conducted involving 15 rehabilitation professionals and eight long term stroke survivors. All recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the principles of qualitative research. Results: Both groups agreed that people with stroke may benefit from more rehabilitation compared to the amount of rehabilitation services presently provided. Views regarding the unavailability of long term rehabilitation services due to multi-factorial barriers were recognised. The groups also highlighted the urgent need for the establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres. Family-assisted home therapy was viewed as a potential approach to continued rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors, given careful planning to overcome several family-related issues. Conclusions: Barriers to the provision of long term stroke rehabilitation services are multi-factorial. Establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres and training family members to conduct home-based therapy are two potential strategies to enable the continuation of rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors.",
keywords = "Family-assisted therapy, Focus groups, Rehabilitation, Stroke",
author = "{Mohd Nordin}, {Nor Azlin} and {Abd Aziz}, Noorazah and {Abdul Aziz}, {Aznida Firzah} and {Ajit Singh}, {Devinder Kaur} and {Omar Othman}, {Nor Aishah} and Saperi Sulong and {Syed Junid}, {Syed Mohamed Al-Junid}",
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AU - Mohd Nordin, Nor Azlin

AU - Abd Aziz, Noorazah

AU - Abdul Aziz, Aznida Firzah

AU - Ajit Singh, Devinder Kaur

AU - Omar Othman, Nor Aishah

AU - Sulong, Saperi

AU - Syed Junid, Syed Mohamed Al-Junid

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AB - The importance of long term rehabilitation for people with stroke is increasingly evident, yet it is not known whether such services can be materialised in countries with limited community resources. In this study, we explored the perception of rehabilitation professionals and people with stroke towards long term stroke rehabilitation services and potential approaches to enable provision of these services. Views from providers and users are important in ensuring whatever strategies developed for long term stroke rehabilitations are feasible and acceptable. Methods. Focus group discussions were conducted involving 15 rehabilitation professionals and eight long term stroke survivors. All recorded conversations were transcribed verbatim and analysed using the principles of qualitative research. Results: Both groups agreed that people with stroke may benefit from more rehabilitation compared to the amount of rehabilitation services presently provided. Views regarding the unavailability of long term rehabilitation services due to multi-factorial barriers were recognised. The groups also highlighted the urgent need for the establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres. Family-assisted home therapy was viewed as a potential approach to continued rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors, given careful planning to overcome several family-related issues. Conclusions: Barriers to the provision of long term stroke rehabilitation services are multi-factorial. Establishment of community-based stroke rehabilitation centres and training family members to conduct home-based therapy are two potential strategies to enable the continuation of rehabilitation for long term stroke survivors.

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