Exploring medical terminology in Miyatake’s Malay-Japanese dictionary (1942)

James Thomas Collins, Karim Harun, Toru Ueda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

On January 31, 1942, a combined Japanese force launched a two-pronged attack on the island of Ambon. Within four days, the Japanese controlled the island, city and airfield. Nellie Jansen, the Dutch resident’s daughter, provided us an eye-witness account of the early days of the occupation. As a volunteer and trained nurse’s assistant, her observations center on medical resources and organization, including the presence of Japanese doctors and pharmacists from the first week of the occupation. She also observed the use of Malay dictionaries by Japanese authorities; for example, she wrote of her chat with a wounded officer: “Dat feit scheen hem erg te vermaken, want hij greep schuddend van het lachen zijn maleise woordenboekje en zei, na er in te hebben gebladerd: “Doeloe besar, sekarang ketjil....”. This article explored what bilingual Malay-Japanese dictionaries were available to Japanese military and civilians who occupied Indonesia. The focus was on the 1942 edition of Masamichi Miyatake’s Kamoes Baroe Bahasa Indonesia-Nippon, first published in 1938. The semantic field studied in this article was medical terminology. Some of these medical terms were selected for comparison with Malay-English dictionaries available at the time, in particular Wilkinson, Winstedt and Wilkinson. This paper is part of a project to examine and evaluate lexicographic resources developed by early twentieth century Japanese scholars and to situate that seldom-studied Japanese scholarship in the global tradition of Malay lexicography.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2285-2298
Number of pages14
JournalPertanika Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities
Volume27
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

dictionary
technical language
Indonesia
occupation
chat
pharmacist
resources
assistant
witness
edition
twentieth century
nurse
semantics
Military
resident
organization
Medical Terminology
Dictionary
Resources
time

Keywords

  • Dictionary
  • Japanese
  • Lexicography
  • Lexicography
  • Malay
  • Medical
  • Miyatake
  • Terminology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)
  • Economics, Econometrics and Finance(all)

Cite this

Exploring medical terminology in Miyatake’s Malay-Japanese dictionary (1942). / Collins, James Thomas; Harun, Karim; Ueda, Toru.

In: Pertanika Journal of Social Sciences and Humanities, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.01.2019, p. 2285-2298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{d7282b3d770e47a0b4d599aef727804e,
title = "Exploring medical terminology in Miyatake’s Malay-Japanese dictionary (1942)",
abstract = "On January 31, 1942, a combined Japanese force launched a two-pronged attack on the island of Ambon. Within four days, the Japanese controlled the island, city and airfield. Nellie Jansen, the Dutch resident’s daughter, provided us an eye-witness account of the early days of the occupation. As a volunteer and trained nurse’s assistant, her observations center on medical resources and organization, including the presence of Japanese doctors and pharmacists from the first week of the occupation. She also observed the use of Malay dictionaries by Japanese authorities; for example, she wrote of her chat with a wounded officer: “Dat feit scheen hem erg te vermaken, want hij greep schuddend van het lachen zijn maleise woordenboekje en zei, na er in te hebben gebladerd: “Doeloe besar, sekarang ketjil....”. This article explored what bilingual Malay-Japanese dictionaries were available to Japanese military and civilians who occupied Indonesia. The focus was on the 1942 edition of Masamichi Miyatake’s Kamoes Baroe Bahasa Indonesia-Nippon, first published in 1938. The semantic field studied in this article was medical terminology. Some of these medical terms were selected for comparison with Malay-English dictionaries available at the time, in particular Wilkinson, Winstedt and Wilkinson. This paper is part of a project to examine and evaluate lexicographic resources developed by early twentieth century Japanese scholars and to situate that seldom-studied Japanese scholarship in the global tradition of Malay lexicography.",
keywords = "Dictionary, Japanese, Lexicography, Lexicography, Malay, Medical, Miyatake, Terminology",
author = "Collins, {James Thomas} and Karim Harun and Toru Ueda",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "27",
pages = "2285--2298",
journal = "Pertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities",
issn = "0128-7702",
publisher = "Universiti Putra Malaysia",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exploring medical terminology in Miyatake’s Malay-Japanese dictionary (1942)

AU - Collins, James Thomas

AU - Harun, Karim

AU - Ueda, Toru

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - On January 31, 1942, a combined Japanese force launched a two-pronged attack on the island of Ambon. Within four days, the Japanese controlled the island, city and airfield. Nellie Jansen, the Dutch resident’s daughter, provided us an eye-witness account of the early days of the occupation. As a volunteer and trained nurse’s assistant, her observations center on medical resources and organization, including the presence of Japanese doctors and pharmacists from the first week of the occupation. She also observed the use of Malay dictionaries by Japanese authorities; for example, she wrote of her chat with a wounded officer: “Dat feit scheen hem erg te vermaken, want hij greep schuddend van het lachen zijn maleise woordenboekje en zei, na er in te hebben gebladerd: “Doeloe besar, sekarang ketjil....”. This article explored what bilingual Malay-Japanese dictionaries were available to Japanese military and civilians who occupied Indonesia. The focus was on the 1942 edition of Masamichi Miyatake’s Kamoes Baroe Bahasa Indonesia-Nippon, first published in 1938. The semantic field studied in this article was medical terminology. Some of these medical terms were selected for comparison with Malay-English dictionaries available at the time, in particular Wilkinson, Winstedt and Wilkinson. This paper is part of a project to examine and evaluate lexicographic resources developed by early twentieth century Japanese scholars and to situate that seldom-studied Japanese scholarship in the global tradition of Malay lexicography.

AB - On January 31, 1942, a combined Japanese force launched a two-pronged attack on the island of Ambon. Within four days, the Japanese controlled the island, city and airfield. Nellie Jansen, the Dutch resident’s daughter, provided us an eye-witness account of the early days of the occupation. As a volunteer and trained nurse’s assistant, her observations center on medical resources and organization, including the presence of Japanese doctors and pharmacists from the first week of the occupation. She also observed the use of Malay dictionaries by Japanese authorities; for example, she wrote of her chat with a wounded officer: “Dat feit scheen hem erg te vermaken, want hij greep schuddend van het lachen zijn maleise woordenboekje en zei, na er in te hebben gebladerd: “Doeloe besar, sekarang ketjil....”. This article explored what bilingual Malay-Japanese dictionaries were available to Japanese military and civilians who occupied Indonesia. The focus was on the 1942 edition of Masamichi Miyatake’s Kamoes Baroe Bahasa Indonesia-Nippon, first published in 1938. The semantic field studied in this article was medical terminology. Some of these medical terms were selected for comparison with Malay-English dictionaries available at the time, in particular Wilkinson, Winstedt and Wilkinson. This paper is part of a project to examine and evaluate lexicographic resources developed by early twentieth century Japanese scholars and to situate that seldom-studied Japanese scholarship in the global tradition of Malay lexicography.

KW - Dictionary

KW - Japanese

KW - Lexicography

KW - Lexicography

KW - Malay

KW - Medical

KW - Miyatake

KW - Terminology

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076819825&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85076819825&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85076819825

VL - 27

SP - 2285

EP - 2298

JO - Pertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities

JF - Pertanika Journal of Social Science and Humanities

SN - 0128-7702

IS - 4

ER -