Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction among Malay schoolchildren

Norzila Mohamed Zainudin, Bilkis Banu Shri Abd. Aziz, A. L. Haifa, Cheng Teik Deng, Azizi Hj Omar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) may be demonstrated in 60-70% of asthmatic children in temperate climates. In areas of high humidity it is postulated to be low. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of EIB in a population of schoolchildren with wheezing, living in the humid tropical climate of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. Method: We performed a cross-sectional study using the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire to identify 7-12-year-old Malay children with asthma symptoms from a primary school in central Kuala Lumpur. Sixty-five of 76 children with 'ever wheeze' performed an exercise challenge test successfully in an uncontrolled environment. A random sample of 80 schoolchildren with no history of wheeze were similarly tested as controls. The relative humidity and temperature were recorded. A fall of > 15% was considered as clinically important. Results: The prevalence of EIB in schoolchildren with 'ever wheeze' was 47.7%. The prevalence of EIB in children with 'current wheeze' was 51.6%. The prevalence of EIB in controls was 7.5%. The relative humidity during the study ranged from 41 to 90%. There was no significant relationship between different humidity levels and EIB (P=0.58, regression analysis). Conclusion: This study demonstrates that EIB is present in asthmatic children despite the highly humid tropical environment.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-155
Number of pages5
JournalRespirology
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Bronchoconstriction
Exercise
Humidity
Asthma
Tropical Climate
Malaysia
Respiratory Sounds
Climate
Exercise Test
Hypersensitivity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Temperature
Population

Keywords

  • Asthma
  • Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction
  • Relative humidity
  • Schoolchildren
  • Tropical climate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

Cite this

Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction among Malay schoolchildren. / Zainudin, Norzila Mohamed; Shri Abd. Aziz, Bilkis Banu; Haifa, A. L.; Deng, Cheng Teik; Omar, Azizi Hj.

In: Respirology, Vol. 6, No. 2, 2001, p. 151-155.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Zainudin, Norzila Mohamed ; Shri Abd. Aziz, Bilkis Banu ; Haifa, A. L. ; Deng, Cheng Teik ; Omar, Azizi Hj. / Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction among Malay schoolchildren. In: Respirology. 2001 ; Vol. 6, No. 2. pp. 151-155.
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