Evaluation of service management algorithms in a distributed web search system

Ahmed Patel, Muhammad J. Khan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The World Wide Web interconnected through the internet today offers numerous specialist topic-oriented or regional search engines and systems in a largely federated heterogeneous environment. Old ones continue to exist and new ones appear in spite of the tremendous progress achieved by their generic Web-wide rival competitors, because they produce better results in their areas of specialisation. However, finding and choosing the best specialised search engines or systems for a particular information need is difficult. This is made even more complicated by the fact that these engines and systems would want to carve out a niche market that generates maximum revenue for themselves. The ADSA (Adaptive Distributed Search and Advertising) Web research project has investigated the problem at some depth and had put forward a search architecture which allows many search engines to be independently owned and controlled, offering advantages over existing centralised architectures. One aspect of the architecture has been to evaluate the service management algorithms that were designed to support competing autonomous systems in a cooperative marketplace. Here we present ADSA economic model and the service management strategies that can lead to maximum revenue generation, by making informative and intelligent decisions on search price adjustments of key quantitative parameters, as well as the results of evaluation experiments and briefly discuss the need for standardised interfaces which are required if this concept is to ease development and implementation of such a marketplace in a large scale.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)152-160
Number of pages9
JournalComputer Standards and Interfaces
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Search engines
World Wide Web
search engine
Marketing
evaluation
management
revenue
Internet
market niche
economic model
specialization
Engines
Economics
research project
Web search
Service management
Evaluation
experiment
Experiments
Search engine

Keywords

  • Distributed web search architectures
  • Dynamic pricing
  • Service management
  • Service management algorithms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Software
  • Information Systems and Management

Cite this

Evaluation of service management algorithms in a distributed web search system. / Patel, Ahmed; Khan, Muhammad J.

In: Computer Standards and Interfaces, Vol. 29, No. 2, 02.2007, p. 152-160.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patel, Ahmed ; Khan, Muhammad J. / Evaluation of service management algorithms in a distributed web search system. In: Computer Standards and Interfaces. 2007 ; Vol. 29, No. 2. pp. 152-160.
@article{5e06740cf7b04e2fa1cb19b1ab6c189a,
title = "Evaluation of service management algorithms in a distributed web search system",
abstract = "The World Wide Web interconnected through the internet today offers numerous specialist topic-oriented or regional search engines and systems in a largely federated heterogeneous environment. Old ones continue to exist and new ones appear in spite of the tremendous progress achieved by their generic Web-wide rival competitors, because they produce better results in their areas of specialisation. However, finding and choosing the best specialised search engines or systems for a particular information need is difficult. This is made even more complicated by the fact that these engines and systems would want to carve out a niche market that generates maximum revenue for themselves. The ADSA (Adaptive Distributed Search and Advertising) Web research project has investigated the problem at some depth and had put forward a search architecture which allows many search engines to be independently owned and controlled, offering advantages over existing centralised architectures. One aspect of the architecture has been to evaluate the service management algorithms that were designed to support competing autonomous systems in a cooperative marketplace. Here we present ADSA economic model and the service management strategies that can lead to maximum revenue generation, by making informative and intelligent decisions on search price adjustments of key quantitative parameters, as well as the results of evaluation experiments and briefly discuss the need for standardised interfaces which are required if this concept is to ease development and implementation of such a marketplace in a large scale.",
keywords = "Distributed web search architectures, Dynamic pricing, Service management, Service management algorithms",
author = "Ahmed Patel and Khan, {Muhammad J.}",
year = "2007",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1016/j.csi.2006.03.002",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "152--160",
journal = "Computer Standards and Interfaces",
issn = "0920-5489",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of service management algorithms in a distributed web search system

AU - Patel, Ahmed

AU - Khan, Muhammad J.

PY - 2007/2

Y1 - 2007/2

N2 - The World Wide Web interconnected through the internet today offers numerous specialist topic-oriented or regional search engines and systems in a largely federated heterogeneous environment. Old ones continue to exist and new ones appear in spite of the tremendous progress achieved by their generic Web-wide rival competitors, because they produce better results in their areas of specialisation. However, finding and choosing the best specialised search engines or systems for a particular information need is difficult. This is made even more complicated by the fact that these engines and systems would want to carve out a niche market that generates maximum revenue for themselves. The ADSA (Adaptive Distributed Search and Advertising) Web research project has investigated the problem at some depth and had put forward a search architecture which allows many search engines to be independently owned and controlled, offering advantages over existing centralised architectures. One aspect of the architecture has been to evaluate the service management algorithms that were designed to support competing autonomous systems in a cooperative marketplace. Here we present ADSA economic model and the service management strategies that can lead to maximum revenue generation, by making informative and intelligent decisions on search price adjustments of key quantitative parameters, as well as the results of evaluation experiments and briefly discuss the need for standardised interfaces which are required if this concept is to ease development and implementation of such a marketplace in a large scale.

AB - The World Wide Web interconnected through the internet today offers numerous specialist topic-oriented or regional search engines and systems in a largely federated heterogeneous environment. Old ones continue to exist and new ones appear in spite of the tremendous progress achieved by their generic Web-wide rival competitors, because they produce better results in their areas of specialisation. However, finding and choosing the best specialised search engines or systems for a particular information need is difficult. This is made even more complicated by the fact that these engines and systems would want to carve out a niche market that generates maximum revenue for themselves. The ADSA (Adaptive Distributed Search and Advertising) Web research project has investigated the problem at some depth and had put forward a search architecture which allows many search engines to be independently owned and controlled, offering advantages over existing centralised architectures. One aspect of the architecture has been to evaluate the service management algorithms that were designed to support competing autonomous systems in a cooperative marketplace. Here we present ADSA economic model and the service management strategies that can lead to maximum revenue generation, by making informative and intelligent decisions on search price adjustments of key quantitative parameters, as well as the results of evaluation experiments and briefly discuss the need for standardised interfaces which are required if this concept is to ease development and implementation of such a marketplace in a large scale.

KW - Distributed web search architectures

KW - Dynamic pricing

KW - Service management

KW - Service management algorithms

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33751420849&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33751420849&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.csi.2006.03.002

DO - 10.1016/j.csi.2006.03.002

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 152

EP - 160

JO - Computer Standards and Interfaces

JF - Computer Standards and Interfaces

SN - 0920-5489

IS - 2

ER -