Evaluating the effects of road geometry, environment, and traffic volume on rollover crashes

Mehdi Hosseinpour, Ahmad Shukri Yahaya, Ahmad Farhan Sadullah, Noriszura Ismail, Seyed Mohammad Reza Ghadiri

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There are a number of factors that cause motor vehicles to rollover. However, the impacts of roadway characteristics on rollover crashes have rarely been addressed in the literature. This study aims to apply a set of crash prediction models in order to estimate the number of rollovers as a function of road geometry, the environment, and traffic conditions. To this end, seven count-data models, including Poisson (PM), negative binomial (NB), heterogeneous negative binomial (HTNB), zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP), zero-inflated negative binomial (ZINB), hurdle Poisson (HP), and hurdle negative binomial (HNB) models, were developed and compared using crash data collected on 448 segments of Malaysian federal roads. The results showed that the HTNB was the best-fit model among the others to model the frequency of rollovers. The variables Light-Vehicle Traffic (LVT), horizontal curvature, access points, speed limit, and centreline median were positively associated with the crash frequency, while UnPaved Shoulder Width (UPSW) and Heavy-Vehicle Traffic (HVT) were found to have the opposite effect. The findings of this study suggest that rollovers could potentially be reduced by developing road safety countermeasures, such as access management of driveways, straightening sharp horizontal curves, widening shoulder width, better design of centreline medians, and posting lower speed limits and warning signs in areas with higher rollover tendency.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-232
Number of pages12
JournalTransport
Volume31
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2016

Fingerprint

Geometry
Widening (transportation arteries)
Driveways
Straightening
Telecommunication traffic
Data structures
Statistical Models

Keywords

  • crash prediction models
  • over-dispersion
  • rollover
  • zero-altered models

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Automotive Engineering

Cite this

Hosseinpour, M., Shukri Yahaya, A., Farhan Sadullah, A., Ismail, N., & Reza Ghadiri, S. M. (2016). Evaluating the effects of road geometry, environment, and traffic volume on rollover crashes. Transport, 31(2), 221-232. https://doi.org/10.3846/16484142.2016.1193046

Evaluating the effects of road geometry, environment, and traffic volume on rollover crashes. / Hosseinpour, Mehdi; Shukri Yahaya, Ahmad; Farhan Sadullah, Ahmad; Ismail, Noriszura; Reza Ghadiri, Seyed Mohammad.

In: Transport, Vol. 31, No. 2, 02.04.2016, p. 221-232.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hosseinpour, M, Shukri Yahaya, A, Farhan Sadullah, A, Ismail, N & Reza Ghadiri, SM 2016, 'Evaluating the effects of road geometry, environment, and traffic volume on rollover crashes', Transport, vol. 31, no. 2, pp. 221-232. https://doi.org/10.3846/16484142.2016.1193046
Hosseinpour, Mehdi ; Shukri Yahaya, Ahmad ; Farhan Sadullah, Ahmad ; Ismail, Noriszura ; Reza Ghadiri, Seyed Mohammad. / Evaluating the effects of road geometry, environment, and traffic volume on rollover crashes. In: Transport. 2016 ; Vol. 31, No. 2. pp. 221-232.
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