Evaluating crossbred red rice variants for postprandial glucometabolic responses

A comparison with commercial varieties

Chee Hee Se, Khun Aik Chuah, Ankitta Mishra, R Wickneswari V Ratnam, Tilakavati Karupaiah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Consumption of white rice predisposes some Asian populations to increased risk of type 2 diabetes. We compared the postprandial glucometabolic responses to three newly-developed crossbred red rice variants (UKMRC9, UKMRC10, UKMRC11) against three selected commercial rice types (Thai red, Basmati white, Jasmine white) using 50-g carbohydrate equivalents provided to 12 normoglycaemic adults in a crossover design. Venous blood was drawn fasted and postprandially for three hours. Glycaemic (GI) and insulin (II) indices, incremental areas-under-the-curves for glucose and insulin (IAUCins), indices of insulin sensitivity and secretion, lactate and peptide hormones (motilin, neuropeptide-Y, orexin-A) were analyzed. The lowest to highest trends for GI and II were similar i.e., UKMRC9 <Basmati <Thai red <UKMRC10 <UKMRC11 <Jasmine. Postprandial insulinaemia and IAUCins of only UKMRC9 were significantly the lowest compared to Jasmine. Crude protein and fiber content correlated negatively with the GI values of the test rice. Although peptide hormones were not associated with GI and II characteristics of test rice, early and late phases of prandial neuropeptide-Y changes were negatively correlated with postprandial insulinaemia. This study indicated that only UKMRC9 among the new rice crossbreeds could serve as an alternative cereal option to improve diet quality of Asians with its lowest glycaemic and insulinaemic burden.

Original languageEnglish
Article number308
JournalNutrients
Volume8
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 May 2016

Fingerprint

red rice
crossbreds
Jasminum
insulin
rice
Insulin
peptide hormones
neuropeptide Y
hyperinsulinemia
Peptide Hormones
Neuropeptide Y
motilin
Area Under Curve
glucose
Motilin
insulin secretion
nutritional adequacy
Glycemic Index
Glucose
crude fiber

Keywords

  • Cross-breeding
  • Glycaemic index
  • Insulin resistance
  • Peptide hormones
  • Red rice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Evaluating crossbred red rice variants for postprandial glucometabolic responses : A comparison with commercial varieties. / Se, Chee Hee; Chuah, Khun Aik; Mishra, Ankitta; V Ratnam, R Wickneswari; Karupaiah, Tilakavati.

In: Nutrients, Vol. 8, No. 5, 308, 20.05.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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