Ethnic relations in Malaysia from an Islamic perspective

Nazri Muslim, Nik Yusri Musa, Ahmad Hidayat Buang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Islam is a complete way of life (din) and encompasses all activities in life. Islam preaches to its followers to enjoin good not only towards fellow Muslims but also between Muslims and non-Muslims. Non-Muslims have certain rights and are protected for as long as they are not against Islam. In regard to relations among Muslims and non-Muslims, Islam outlines specific regulations such as the ones found in Chapter al-Hujurat verse 13 that recognises ethnic diversity as a norm and that diversity is meant for people to know one another better, and not to cause conflict. Therefore, this article discusses the Islamic viewpoint on ethnicity from the perspectives of the al-Quran, prophetic traditions and Muslim scholars. Also discussed is the principle of justice and equality in Islam in relation to Malaysia particularly related to the special position of Malays in Article 153 of the Federal Constitution. The findings show that the special position of Malays does not contradict the principle of justice and equality in Islam based on four arguments: First, the Malays receive their special position as enshrined in the Federal Constitution without incurring any acts of confiscating the wealth of the non-Muslims, but instead gained from the growing economy as a whole. Second, the special position of Malays is not employed at the expense of the economic and political wellbeing of the non-Malays. Third, the special position of Malays was established long before independence and was later reinstated when the Federal Constitution was formulated. Fourth, the Malays' special position was attained through a consensus achieved by the various ethnic groups in the country.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-28
Number of pages28
JournalKajian Malaysia
Volume29
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2011

Fingerprint

Islam
Malaysia
Muslim
constitution
equality
justice
way of life
follower
Ethnic Relations
ethnic group
ethnicity
regulation
economy
cause
Muslims
economics
Constitution
Equality
Ethnic Groups
Justice

Keywords

  • Article 153
  • Equality
  • Ethnic relations
  • Federal Constitution
  • Islam
  • Justice
  • Malays
  • Non-Malays

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cultural Studies
  • History
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Muslim, N., Musa, N. Y., & Buang, A. H. (2011). Ethnic relations in Malaysia from an Islamic perspective. Kajian Malaysia, 29(1), 1-28.

Ethnic relations in Malaysia from an Islamic perspective. / Muslim, Nazri; Musa, Nik Yusri; Buang, Ahmad Hidayat.

In: Kajian Malaysia, Vol. 29, No. 1, 2011, p. 1-28.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Muslim, N, Musa, NY & Buang, AH 2011, 'Ethnic relations in Malaysia from an Islamic perspective', Kajian Malaysia, vol. 29, no. 1, pp. 1-28.
Muslim, Nazri ; Musa, Nik Yusri ; Buang, Ahmad Hidayat. / Ethnic relations in Malaysia from an Islamic perspective. In: Kajian Malaysia. 2011 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 1-28.
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