Ethnic differences in the prevalence, clinical outcome and cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) virulence gene profiles of Helicobacter pylori strains from Malaysia

R. A. Hamat, E. Nor Amalina, O. Malina, S. Zamberi, Alfizah Hanafiah, Mohd Rizal Abdul Manaf, A. Aminuddin, M. Ramelah

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Different Helicobacter pylori genes may be well conserved within different ethnic groups and could give rise to different clinical outcomes. In this study, we demonstrated a low prevalence of H. pylori infection (19.2%) which is in concordance with the current trend demostrated locally and abroad. The Indians had the highest prevalence of H. pylori infection among other ethnic groups (Malays= 8.6 %, Chinese= 24.3 %, Indians= 33.9%). cagM and cagT were the most predominant genes found (63.4% for each), followed by cagA (62.2 %), cagE (48.2%), cag6-7 (46.3%), cag10 (42.1%), cag13 (4.9%) and IS605 (3.7%). No significant association was found between H. pylori infection and H. pylori genes with ethnic groups or clinical outcomes. Indians who had a combination of cagA/ E/M genes of H. pylori were likely to be associated with 21-time of having non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD) than peptic ulcer disease (PUD). Therefore, these genes may serve as useful markers in predicting the clinical presentation of a H. pylori infection among Indians in our studied population. Hence, this preliminary data might explain why Indians have a low prevalence of gastric cancer and peptic ulcer disease despite having persistently high prevalence of H. pylori infection for many decades ("Indian enigma") in Malaysian patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)289-298
Number of pages10
JournalPertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science
Volume36
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2013

Fingerprint

ethnic differences
pathogenicity islands
Genomic Islands
Helicobacter pylori
Malaysia
pathogenicity
virulence
Virulence
Genes
Helicobacter Infections
ethnic group
gene
genes
nationalities and ethnic groups
Ethnic Groups
peptic ulcers
infection
Peptic Ulcer
cancer
indigestion

Keywords

  • Cag pathogenicity island
  • Ethnicity
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Malaysia
  • Non-peptic ulcer dyspepsia
  • Peptic ulcer diseases
  • Virulence genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Chemical Engineering(all)
  • Computer Science(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)

Cite this

Ethnic differences in the prevalence, clinical outcome and cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) virulence gene profiles of Helicobacter pylori strains from Malaysia. / Hamat, R. A.; Nor Amalina, E.; Malina, O.; Zamberi, S.; Hanafiah, Alfizah; Abdul Manaf, Mohd Rizal; Aminuddin, A.; Ramelah, M.

In: Pertanika Journal of Tropical Agricultural Science, Vol. 36, No. 4, 11.2013, p. 289-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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