Estimating genetic change from selection

G. A E Gall, Yosni Bakar, T. Famula

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Estimating genetic change for selection programs designed to improve performance of fish populations requires the application of statistical and biological approaches specific to the conditions used to maintain the populations. The unique set of limitations is determined by such factors as number of individuals reared, availability of control populations, variability of environmental conditions, rearing strategy, and completeness of data collection. All approaches available to the fish breeder are designed to remove to the extent possible, both fixed and random environmental effects from estimates of change. Some methods also attempt to account for genetic trends due to previous selection. Generally, influences attributable to genetic drift and inbreeding are confounded with effects of selection. Four approaches to estimating genetic change have been developed for use in animal breeding. The most common is the use of control populations to estimate environmental change and possibly account for some inbreeding effects related to population size. The second is to use divergent selection as a means of internally correcting for environmental changes and adjusting for asymmetry of response to selection. Contemporary comparisons is a common method with species for which gametes can be stored. The method is based on producing progeny from parents of early and late generation progeny in a single season to provide a direct comparison of performance of individuals from two or more generations. The most recently developed approach involves the use of animal models, based on best linear unbiased prediction procedures, to estimate directly the average breeding values for sequential generations. Information for all individuals in a pedigreed population is utilized to provide simultaneous adjustments for environmental effects and genetic trends.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)75-88
Number of pages14
JournalAquaculture
Volume111
Issue number1-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 1993
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

genetic trend
inbreeding
environmental effect
environmental change
breeding
animal
animal breeding
genetic drift
gamete
fish
breeding value
rearing
population size
germ cells
asymmetry
animal models
methodology
environmental conditions
environmental factors
prediction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Estimating genetic change from selection. / Gall, G. A E; Bakar, Yosni; Famula, T.

In: Aquaculture, Vol. 111, No. 1-4, 01.04.1993, p. 75-88.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gall, G. A E ; Bakar, Yosni ; Famula, T. / Estimating genetic change from selection. In: Aquaculture. 1993 ; Vol. 111, No. 1-4. pp. 75-88.
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