Epiphytic terrestrial algae near pig and poultry farm in Southeast England and its relationship to ammonia and other nitrogenous gases emitted from the source

Asmida Ismail, Simon Archer, Jeffrey Bates, Dzulsuhaimi Daud, Ahmad Ismail

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Abstract

Ammonia has been regarded as one of the most important atmospheric pollutants which contribute to the changing ecosystems. A study on the effect of increased concentrations of ammonia (NH3) and other nitrogenous gases (NO2, NOx and NO) in intensive livestock farm was conducted to understand the dynamics of epiphytic microalgae exposed to the pollutants and to determine the pollutant which imposed the greatest effect on algal density. Systematic data collection was conducted in a large husbandry unit in the south east of England using 15×15 cm quadrats positioned on trees, along a line transect. NH3 is regarded as the primary pollutant since it showed a strong positive correlation with algal density (p<0.001, r=0.912). NOx also showing a positive correlation while NO2 and NO showed no correlation. Numbers of algae were significantly higher nearer the source of N-gases. However, at 150 m from the N-source, data showed a 72% reduction of algal density. This study suggests that local high N deposition is contributing to the dominance of nitrophilous species, which altered species composition of epiphytic terrestrial algae.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)162-168
Number of pages7
JournalAdvances in Environmental Biology
Volume9
Issue number14
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015

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  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

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Epiphytic terrestrial algae near pig and poultry farm in Southeast England and its relationship to ammonia and other nitrogenous gases emitted from the source. / Ismail, Asmida; Archer, Simon; Bates, Jeffrey; Daud, Dzulsuhaimi; Ismail, Ahmad.

In: Advances in Environmental Biology, Vol. 9, No. 14, 01.07.2015, p. 162-168.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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