Entrepreneurship as worship

A Malay Muslim perspective

Farhana Sidek, Kathryn Pavlovich, Jenny Gibb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

While Islam is the second largest religion in the world with 1.6 billion Muslims, there are variations in the interpretations of that law (i.e., Sharia). This diversity and variation may hold the key in explaining the different behaviours among Muslim entrepreneurs because of their views on the concept of work as worship. In this study, we examine how Malay entrepreneurs are guided in their sourcing and shaping of entrepreneurial opportunities through Shafii practice. Our contributions include identifying five central values that guided the participant’s sourcing of opportunities: Fardhu Kifayah (communal obligation), Wasatiyyah (balanced), Dakwah1 (the call of joining the good and forbidding the bad), Amanah (trust), and Barakah (blessings). We also contribute to the entrepreneurship literature by demonstrating how these macro-level values of worship gave the entrepreneurs confidence in creating their new ventures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-13
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Management and Organization
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2 May 2018

Fingerprint

Entrepreneurs
Muslims
Entrepreneurship
Sourcing
Entrepreneurial opportunity
New ventures
Islam
Confidence
Obligation

Keywords

  • cultural values
  • entrepreneurship
  • qualitative methods
  • spirituality and religion

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

Entrepreneurship as worship : A Malay Muslim perspective. / Sidek, Farhana; Pavlovich, Kathryn; Gibb, Jenny.

In: Journal of Management and Organization, 02.05.2018, p. 1-13.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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