Enhanced growth and nutrients removal efficiency of Characium sp. cultured in agricultural wastewater via acclimatized inoculum and effluent recycling

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Effective wastewater treatment by microalgae depends on its ability to grow well in the wastewater. This is particularly challenging in concentrated agricultural wastewater such as Palm oil Mill Effluent (POME) where light is limited. This study assessed the effect of acclimatized inoculum in combination with POME dilution using final effluent discharge to improve microalgae growth. A native microalgae, Characium sp. that exhibited superior growth rate from preliminary study was used. Firstly, the effect of inoculum density and POME concentration on the maximum specific growth rate (μmax) was investigated. From the result, the highest μmax of 0.57 was achieved by 0.5 g L-1 inoculum in 50% POME concentration. In the second stage, analysis was continued using acclimatized inoculum cultured into 50% POME diluted with final effluent and distilled water respectively. Findings showed that dilution using final effluent produced remarkably higher μmax of 1.87 compared to 1.06 when diluted with distilled water. It also successfully removed 21.5% of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), 80.0% of Total Nitrogen (TN) and 89.9% of Total Phosphorus (TP), within five (5) days of cultivation. Outcome of this study suggested that microalgae growth in wastewater can be stimulate, via feasible acclimatization and recycling of final effluent as dilution water. This improved growth will imply better performance in the bioremediation of the wastewater.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3426-3432
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Environmental Chemical Engineering
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2016

Fingerprint

Nutrients
Recycling
Effluents
Wastewater
recycling
effluent
Palm oil
wastewater
mill
oil
Dilution
dilution
Water
nutrient removal
Bioremediation
Chemical oxygen demand
acclimation
bioremediation
Wastewater treatment
chemical oxygen demand

Keywords

  • Acclimatization
  • Characium sp
  • Microalgae growth rate
  • Nutrients removal
  • Palm Oil Mills Effluent (POME)
  • Wastewater recycling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemical Engineering (miscellaneous)
  • Process Chemistry and Technology
  • Pollution
  • Waste Management and Disposal

Cite this

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title = "Enhanced growth and nutrients removal efficiency of Characium sp. cultured in agricultural wastewater via acclimatized inoculum and effluent recycling",
abstract = "Effective wastewater treatment by microalgae depends on its ability to grow well in the wastewater. This is particularly challenging in concentrated agricultural wastewater such as Palm oil Mill Effluent (POME) where light is limited. This study assessed the effect of acclimatized inoculum in combination with POME dilution using final effluent discharge to improve microalgae growth. A native microalgae, Characium sp. that exhibited superior growth rate from preliminary study was used. Firstly, the effect of inoculum density and POME concentration on the maximum specific growth rate (μmax) was investigated. From the result, the highest μmax of 0.57 was achieved by 0.5 g L-1 inoculum in 50{\%} POME concentration. In the second stage, analysis was continued using acclimatized inoculum cultured into 50{\%} POME diluted with final effluent and distilled water respectively. Findings showed that dilution using final effluent produced remarkably higher μmax of 1.87 compared to 1.06 when diluted with distilled water. It also successfully removed 21.5{\%} of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), 80.0{\%} of Total Nitrogen (TN) and 89.9{\%} of Total Phosphorus (TP), within five (5) days of cultivation. Outcome of this study suggested that microalgae growth in wastewater can be stimulate, via feasible acclimatization and recycling of final effluent as dilution water. This improved growth will imply better performance in the bioremediation of the wastewater.",
keywords = "Acclimatization, Characium sp, Microalgae growth rate, Nutrients removal, Palm Oil Mills Effluent (POME), Wastewater recycling",
author = "Khalid, {Azianabiha A Halip} and Zahira Yaakob and {Sheikh Abdullah}, {Siti Rozaimah} and Takriff, {Mohd Sobri}",
year = "2016",
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language = "English",
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T1 - Enhanced growth and nutrients removal efficiency of Characium sp. cultured in agricultural wastewater via acclimatized inoculum and effluent recycling

AU - Khalid, Azianabiha A Halip

AU - Yaakob, Zahira

AU - Sheikh Abdullah, Siti Rozaimah

AU - Takriff, Mohd Sobri

PY - 2016/9/1

Y1 - 2016/9/1

N2 - Effective wastewater treatment by microalgae depends on its ability to grow well in the wastewater. This is particularly challenging in concentrated agricultural wastewater such as Palm oil Mill Effluent (POME) where light is limited. This study assessed the effect of acclimatized inoculum in combination with POME dilution using final effluent discharge to improve microalgae growth. A native microalgae, Characium sp. that exhibited superior growth rate from preliminary study was used. Firstly, the effect of inoculum density and POME concentration on the maximum specific growth rate (μmax) was investigated. From the result, the highest μmax of 0.57 was achieved by 0.5 g L-1 inoculum in 50% POME concentration. In the second stage, analysis was continued using acclimatized inoculum cultured into 50% POME diluted with final effluent and distilled water respectively. Findings showed that dilution using final effluent produced remarkably higher μmax of 1.87 compared to 1.06 when diluted with distilled water. It also successfully removed 21.5% of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), 80.0% of Total Nitrogen (TN) and 89.9% of Total Phosphorus (TP), within five (5) days of cultivation. Outcome of this study suggested that microalgae growth in wastewater can be stimulate, via feasible acclimatization and recycling of final effluent as dilution water. This improved growth will imply better performance in the bioremediation of the wastewater.

AB - Effective wastewater treatment by microalgae depends on its ability to grow well in the wastewater. This is particularly challenging in concentrated agricultural wastewater such as Palm oil Mill Effluent (POME) where light is limited. This study assessed the effect of acclimatized inoculum in combination with POME dilution using final effluent discharge to improve microalgae growth. A native microalgae, Characium sp. that exhibited superior growth rate from preliminary study was used. Firstly, the effect of inoculum density and POME concentration on the maximum specific growth rate (μmax) was investigated. From the result, the highest μmax of 0.57 was achieved by 0.5 g L-1 inoculum in 50% POME concentration. In the second stage, analysis was continued using acclimatized inoculum cultured into 50% POME diluted with final effluent and distilled water respectively. Findings showed that dilution using final effluent produced remarkably higher μmax of 1.87 compared to 1.06 when diluted with distilled water. It also successfully removed 21.5% of Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), 80.0% of Total Nitrogen (TN) and 89.9% of Total Phosphorus (TP), within five (5) days of cultivation. Outcome of this study suggested that microalgae growth in wastewater can be stimulate, via feasible acclimatization and recycling of final effluent as dilution water. This improved growth will imply better performance in the bioremediation of the wastewater.

KW - Acclimatization

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