Enhanced crude oil hydrocarbon degradation by self-immobilized bacterial consortium culture on sawdust and oil palm empty fruit bunch

Mohammad Hazaimeh, Sahilah Abd. Mutalib, Palsan Sannasi Abdullah, Wong Kok Kee, Salmijah Surif

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study reports enhanced degradation of crude oil hydrocarbons by a bacterial consortium culture (CC) immobilized onto sawdust (SD) and oil palms empty fruit bunch (OPEFB). The bacterial surface hydrophobic property of the bacterial CC was 60.3 ± 2.20 %, which suggested high bacterial cell attachment onto the carrier materials. The free bacterial CC exhibited the ability to produce exopolysaccharide (EPS) in minimal salt medium (MSM). The highest value of EPS produced by free bacteria CC was 61.3 ± 2.10 %. Due to their surface hydrophobic properties and ability to produce EPS, the bacterial CC was self-immobilized onto OPEFB and SD. The immobilized bacterial CC was then used to degrade crude oil hydrocarbons. The results showed that bacterial CC immobilized onto OPEFB and SD increased degradation of crude oil by 17.52 % and, 15.85 % respectively, at week 6 of incubation, and shortened the time to complete degradation by 25 % (from 8 to 6 weeks) compared to free bacterial CC. Immobilized bacterial CC enhanced biosurfactant production, as indicated by the emulsification index (E24%). Thus, the present study demonstrated that bacterial CC immobilized onto carrier materials increases crude oil degradation by increasing production of biosurfactants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1769-1777
Number of pages9
JournalAnnals of Microbiology
Volume64
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Nov 2014

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Petroleum
Hydrocarbons
Fruit
Oils
Surface Properties
Salts
Bacteria

Keywords

  • Consortium culture
  • Crude oil hydrocarbon degradation
  • Exopolysaccharide
  • Immobilized cells
  • Oil palm empty fruit bunch
  • Sawdust

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Enhanced crude oil hydrocarbon degradation by self-immobilized bacterial consortium culture on sawdust and oil palm empty fruit bunch. / Hazaimeh, Mohammad; Abd. Mutalib, Sahilah; Abdullah, Palsan Sannasi; Kok Kee, Wong; Surif, Salmijah.

In: Annals of Microbiology, Vol. 64, No. 4, 14.11.2014, p. 1769-1777.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hazaimeh, Mohammad ; Abd. Mutalib, Sahilah ; Abdullah, Palsan Sannasi ; Kok Kee, Wong ; Surif, Salmijah. / Enhanced crude oil hydrocarbon degradation by self-immobilized bacterial consortium culture on sawdust and oil palm empty fruit bunch. In: Annals of Microbiology. 2014 ; Vol. 64, No. 4. pp. 1769-1777.
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abstract = "This study reports enhanced degradation of crude oil hydrocarbons by a bacterial consortium culture (CC) immobilized onto sawdust (SD) and oil palms empty fruit bunch (OPEFB). The bacterial surface hydrophobic property of the bacterial CC was 60.3 ± 2.20 {\%}, which suggested high bacterial cell attachment onto the carrier materials. The free bacterial CC exhibited the ability to produce exopolysaccharide (EPS) in minimal salt medium (MSM). The highest value of EPS produced by free bacteria CC was 61.3 ± 2.10 {\%}. Due to their surface hydrophobic properties and ability to produce EPS, the bacterial CC was self-immobilized onto OPEFB and SD. The immobilized bacterial CC was then used to degrade crude oil hydrocarbons. The results showed that bacterial CC immobilized onto OPEFB and SD increased degradation of crude oil by 17.52 {\%} and, 15.85 {\%} respectively, at week 6 of incubation, and shortened the time to complete degradation by 25 {\%} (from 8 to 6 weeks) compared to free bacterial CC. Immobilized bacterial CC enhanced biosurfactant production, as indicated by the emulsification index (E24{\%}). Thus, the present study demonstrated that bacterial CC immobilized onto carrier materials increases crude oil degradation by increasing production of biosurfactants.",
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