Energy intake and activity pattern during pregnancy in relation to infant birth weight.

Z. Hashim, M. I. Noor

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    1 Citation (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The study was designed to determine if the activity pattern of pregnancy women on an intake of energy lower than that recommended will affect fetal growth. Subjects who volunteered were either attending public or private hospitals. Pregnant women in the "private" group were significantly older (p < 0.001) weighed somewhat less and significantly taller (p < 0.001) when compared to the "public" group. Differences in energy intake during the second and third trimesters between the "public" and "private" groups were small; 1608 +/- 334, 1726 +/- 271 kcal and 1627 +/- 367, 1778 +/- 260 kcal, respectively. However, daily activity patterns revealed that the "public" group was more active as reflected by the higher energy expenditure of 1412 +/- 74 kcal and 1578 +/- kcal during the second and third trimesters respectively. There was a significant difference (p < 0.01) in birth weight between the "public" and "private" groups; 2951 +/- 377 g and 3173 +/- 357 g respectively. This study indicates that energy intakes lower than recommended and sedentary lifestyles have no direct influence on birth weights of babies.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)34-38
    Number of pages5
    JournalAsia-Pacific journal of public health / Asia-Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health
    Volume7
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - 1994

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    Energy Intake
    Birth Weight
    Third Pregnancy Trimester
    Second Pregnancy Trimester
    Pregnancy
    Sedentary Lifestyle
    Private Hospitals
    Public Hospitals
    Fetal Development
    Energy Metabolism
    Pregnant Women

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

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    AU - Noor, M. I.

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    N2 - The study was designed to determine if the activity pattern of pregnancy women on an intake of energy lower than that recommended will affect fetal growth. Subjects who volunteered were either attending public or private hospitals. Pregnant women in the "private" group were significantly older (p < 0.001) weighed somewhat less and significantly taller (p < 0.001) when compared to the "public" group. Differences in energy intake during the second and third trimesters between the "public" and "private" groups were small; 1608 +/- 334, 1726 +/- 271 kcal and 1627 +/- 367, 1778 +/- 260 kcal, respectively. However, daily activity patterns revealed that the "public" group was more active as reflected by the higher energy expenditure of 1412 +/- 74 kcal and 1578 +/- kcal during the second and third trimesters respectively. There was a significant difference (p < 0.01) in birth weight between the "public" and "private" groups; 2951 +/- 377 g and 3173 +/- 357 g respectively. This study indicates that energy intakes lower than recommended and sedentary lifestyles have no direct influence on birth weights of babies.

    AB - The study was designed to determine if the activity pattern of pregnancy women on an intake of energy lower than that recommended will affect fetal growth. Subjects who volunteered were either attending public or private hospitals. Pregnant women in the "private" group were significantly older (p < 0.001) weighed somewhat less and significantly taller (p < 0.001) when compared to the "public" group. Differences in energy intake during the second and third trimesters between the "public" and "private" groups were small; 1608 +/- 334, 1726 +/- 271 kcal and 1627 +/- 367, 1778 +/- 260 kcal, respectively. However, daily activity patterns revealed that the "public" group was more active as reflected by the higher energy expenditure of 1412 +/- 74 kcal and 1578 +/- kcal during the second and third trimesters respectively. There was a significant difference (p < 0.01) in birth weight between the "public" and "private" groups; 2951 +/- 377 g and 3173 +/- 357 g respectively. This study indicates that energy intakes lower than recommended and sedentary lifestyles have no direct influence on birth weights of babies.

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