Energy harvesting for the implantable biomedical devices: Issues and challenges

Hannan M A, Saad Mutashar, Salina Abdul Samad, Aini Hussain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

118 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of implanted devices is essential because of their direct effect on the lives and safety of humanity. This paper presents the current issues and challenges related to all methods used to harvest energy for implantable biomedical devices. The advantages, disadvantages, and future trends of each method are discussed. The concept of harvesting energy from environmental sources and human body motion for implantable devices has gained a new relevance. In this review, the harvesting kinetic, electromagnetic, thermal and infrared radiant energies are discussed. Current issues and challenges related to the typical applications of these methods for energy harvesting are illustrated. Suggestions and discussion of the progress of research on implantable devices are also provided. This review is expected to increase research efforts to develop the battery-less implantable devices with reduced over hole size, low power, high efficiency, high data rate, and improved reliability and feasibility. Based on current literature, we believe that the inductive coupling link is the suitable method to be used to power the battery-less devices. Therefore, in this study, the power efficiency of the inductive coupling method is validated by MATLAB based on suggested values. By further researching and improvements, in the future the implantable and portable medical devices are expected to be free of batteries.

Original languageEnglish
Article number79
JournalBioMedical Engineering Online
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jun 2014

Fingerprint

Energy harvesting
Equipment and Supplies
MATLAB
Infrared radiation
Kinetics
Electromagnetic Phenomena
Human Body
Research
Hot Temperature
Safety

Keywords

  • Electromagnetic
  • Energy harvesting
  • Human motion
  • Implantable biomedical devices
  • Inductive coupling link
  • Kinetic energy
  • Piezoelectric material

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Radiological and Ultrasound Technology
  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Biomaterials

Cite this

Energy harvesting for the implantable biomedical devices : Issues and challenges. / M A, Hannan; Mutashar, Saad; Abdul Samad, Salina; Hussain, Aini.

In: BioMedical Engineering Online, Vol. 13, No. 1, 79, 20.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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