Empty nose syndrome: Case report

Saleh Khaled Aboud, Aini A B Aziz

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Empty Nose Syndrome (ENS) is a term first introduced by Kern and Moore which is used to describe a rare spectrum of various symptoms suffered by patients who had had previous radical turbinate surgery with a CT scan appearance of the paranasal sinuses after gross tissue loss. The most common symptom is so-called "paradoxical" nasal obstruction, reported by the patient despite objectively permeable cavities on clinical examination with no obstacle found on imaging or rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry.1 In most cases, the inferior turbinate (IT) has been resected radically even though middle turbinate (MT) resection has also been implicated.2 Incidence is unknown, as there have been no specific studies published. The estimated rate of ENS following inferior turbinate resection is 20%, which induces simple dry nose.1-2 Houser distinguished several subtypes of ENS according to the resected turbinate: inferior, medial, both, or fourthly, a subtype in which turbinate structures paradoxically appear normal. ENS subcategories are based on the type of tissue that is resected; hence "ENS-both" indicates both the IT and MT were at least partially resected. The management is problematic. We report an elderly gentleman of high social standing with long-standing nasal discharge and chronically blocked nose post radical turbinate surgery many years prior to his presentation, and the management options of ENS.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)32-35
    Number of pages4
    JournalMalta Medical Journal
    Volume25
    Issue number3
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    Turbinates
    Nose
    Rhinomanometry
    Nasal Obstruction
    Paranasal Sinuses
    Acoustics

    Keywords

    • Empty nose syndrome
    • ENS subtypes
    • Presentation
    • Treatment options

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine(all)

    Cite this

    Aboud, S. K., & Aziz, A. A. B. (2013). Empty nose syndrome: Case report. Malta Medical Journal, 25(3), 32-35.

    Empty nose syndrome : Case report. / Aboud, Saleh Khaled; Aziz, Aini A B.

    In: Malta Medical Journal, Vol. 25, No. 3, 2013, p. 32-35.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Aboud, SK & Aziz, AAB 2013, 'Empty nose syndrome: Case report', Malta Medical Journal, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 32-35.
    Aboud SK, Aziz AAB. Empty nose syndrome: Case report. Malta Medical Journal. 2013;25(3):32-35.
    Aboud, Saleh Khaled ; Aziz, Aini A B. / Empty nose syndrome : Case report. In: Malta Medical Journal. 2013 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 32-35.
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