Electroactive biofilms: Current status and future research needs

Abhijeet P. Borole, Gemma Reguera, Bradley Ringeisen, Zhi Wu Wang, Yujie Feng, Byung Hong Kim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

211 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Electroactive biofilms (EABFs) generated by electrochemically active microorganisms have many potential applications in bioenergy and chemicals production. Biofilm electroactivity can have a significant impact on the yield and efficiency of the conversion processes. This review assesses the effects of process and design parameters on the growth and activity of biofilms in bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). First we compare the role of planktonic and biofilm-forming microorganisms in BESs. The effect of physical, chemical, and electrochemical operating parameters such as flow rate, temperature, pH, ionic strength, substrate concentration and loading, external resistance, and redox potential on EABF attributes such as growth rate, exoelectrogen population, formation of extracellular polymeric substances, mediator synthesis, and rate of electron transfer are discussed. The relationship between electrochemical performance and operating parameters is also examined to identify gaps in assessment and the potential role of future modeling efforts. Similarly, we review what is currently known about the mechanisms that enable electroactive biofilms to transfer electrons and also the contribution of the electrical conductivity of the biofilms' exopolymeric components to BES performance. The current status of cathodic biofilms is also reviewed. Complementary approaches that use process control to optimize EABF composition and biomass density, while minimizing mass transfer effects and changes to system design parameters, are likely necessary to improve BES performance to a level needed for commercial consideration. Finally, future research needs that enable better understanding and optimization of the performance of EABFs are outlined.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4813-4834
Number of pages22
JournalEnergy and Environmental Science
Volume4
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Biofilms
biofilm
Microorganisms
microorganism
electron
Electrons
bioenergy
redox potential
Ionic strength
Process control
electrical conductivity
mass transfer
Biomass
Mass transfer
Systems analysis
Flow rate
substrate
parameter
biomass

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Renewable Energy, Sustainability and the Environment
  • Environmental Chemistry
  • Pollution
  • Nuclear Energy and Engineering

Cite this

Borole, A. P., Reguera, G., Ringeisen, B., Wang, Z. W., Feng, Y., & Kim, B. H. (2011). Electroactive biofilms: Current status and future research needs. Energy and Environmental Science, 4(12), 4813-4834. https://doi.org/10.1039/c1ee02511b

Electroactive biofilms : Current status and future research needs. / Borole, Abhijeet P.; Reguera, Gemma; Ringeisen, Bradley; Wang, Zhi Wu; Feng, Yujie; Kim, Byung Hong.

In: Energy and Environmental Science, Vol. 4, No. 12, 12.2011, p. 4813-4834.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Borole, AP, Reguera, G, Ringeisen, B, Wang, ZW, Feng, Y & Kim, BH 2011, 'Electroactive biofilms: Current status and future research needs', Energy and Environmental Science, vol. 4, no. 12, pp. 4813-4834. https://doi.org/10.1039/c1ee02511b
Borole AP, Reguera G, Ringeisen B, Wang ZW, Feng Y, Kim BH. Electroactive biofilms: Current status and future research needs. Energy and Environmental Science. 2011 Dec;4(12):4813-4834. https://doi.org/10.1039/c1ee02511b
Borole, Abhijeet P. ; Reguera, Gemma ; Ringeisen, Bradley ; Wang, Zhi Wu ; Feng, Yujie ; Kim, Byung Hong. / Electroactive biofilms : Current status and future research needs. In: Energy and Environmental Science. 2011 ; Vol. 4, No. 12. pp. 4813-4834.
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