Electricity generation by microbial fuel cell using microorganisms as catalyst in cathode

Jae Kyung Jang, Jinjun Kan, Orianna Bretschger, Yuri A. Gorby, Lewis Hsu, Byung Hong Kim, Kenneth H. Nealson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The cathode reaction is one of the most seriously limiting factors in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The critical dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration of a platinum-loaded graphite electrode was reported as 2.2 mg/l, about 10-fold higher than an aerobic bacterium. A series of MFCs were run with the cathode compartment inoculated with activated sludge (biotic) or not (abiotic) on platinum-loaded or bare graphite electrodes. At the beginning of the operation, the current values from MFCs with a biocathode and abiotic cathode were 2.3 ± 0.1 and 2.6 ± 0.2 mA, respectively, at the air-saturated water supply in the cathode. The current from MFCs with an abiotic cathode did not change, but that of MFCs with a biotic cathode increased to 3.0 mA after 8 weeks. The coulomb efficiency was 59.6% in the MFCs with a biotic cathode, much higher than the value of 15.6% of the abiotic cathode. When the DO supply was reduced, the current from MFCs with an abiotic cathode decreased more sharply than in those with a biotic cathode. When the respiratory inhibitor azide was added to the catholyte, the current decreased in MFCs with a biotic cathode but did not change in MFCs with an abiotic cathode. The power density was higher in MFCs with a biotic cathode (430 W/m3 cathode compartment) than the abiotic cathode MFC (257 W/m3 cathode compartment). Electron microscopic observation revealed nanowire structures in biofilms that developed on both the anode and on the biocathode. These results show that an electron-consuming bacterial consortium can be used as a cathode catalyst to improve the cathode reaction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1765-1773
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Microbiology and Biotechnology
Volume23
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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Bioelectric Energy Sources
Electricity
Electrodes
Graphite
Platinum

Keywords

  • Biocathode
  • Catalyst
  • Electricity generation
  • Microbial fuel cell

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Jang, J. K., Kan, J., Bretschger, O., Gorby, Y. A., Hsu, L., Kim, B. H., & Nealson, K. H. (2013). Electricity generation by microbial fuel cell using microorganisms as catalyst in cathode. Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, 23(12), 1765-1773. https://doi.org/10.4014/jmb.1310.10117

Electricity generation by microbial fuel cell using microorganisms as catalyst in cathode. / Jang, Jae Kyung; Kan, Jinjun; Bretschger, Orianna; Gorby, Yuri A.; Hsu, Lewis; Kim, Byung Hong; Nealson, Kenneth H.

In: Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Vol. 23, No. 12, 2013, p. 1765-1773.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jang, JK, Kan, J, Bretschger, O, Gorby, YA, Hsu, L, Kim, BH & Nealson, KH 2013, 'Electricity generation by microbial fuel cell using microorganisms as catalyst in cathode', Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology, vol. 23, no. 12, pp. 1765-1773. https://doi.org/10.4014/jmb.1310.10117
Jang, Jae Kyung ; Kan, Jinjun ; Bretschger, Orianna ; Gorby, Yuri A. ; Hsu, Lewis ; Kim, Byung Hong ; Nealson, Kenneth H. / Electricity generation by microbial fuel cell using microorganisms as catalyst in cathode. In: Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology. 2013 ; Vol. 23, No. 12. pp. 1765-1773.
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