Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms

Yuri A. Gorby, Svetlana Yanina, Jeffrey S. McLean, Kevin M. Rosso, Dianne Moyles, Alice Dohnalkova, Terry J. Beveridge, In Seop Chang, Byung Hong Kim, Kyung Shik Kim, David E. Culley, Samantha B. Reed, Margaret F. Romine, Daad A. Saffarini, Eric A. Hill, Liang Shi, Dwayne A. Elias, David W. Kennedy, Grigoriy Pinchuk, Kazuya WatanabeShun'ichi Ishii, Bruce Logan, Kenneth H. Nealson, Jim K. Fredrickson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1111 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 produced electrically conductive pilus-like appendages called bacterial nanowires in direct response to electron-acceptor limitation. Mutants deficient in genes for c-type decaheme cytochromes MtrC and OmcA, and those that lacked a functional Type II secretion pathway displayed nanowires that were poorly conductive. These mutants were also deficient in their ability to reduce hydrous ferric oxide and in their ability to generate current in a microbial fuel cell. Nanowires produced by the oxygenic phototrophic cyanobacterium Synechocystis PCC6803 and the thermophilic, fermentative bacterium Pelotomaculum thermopropionicum reveal that electrically conductive appendages are not exclusive to dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria and may, in fact, represent a common bacterial strategy for efficient electron transfer and energy distribution.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11358-11363
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume103
Issue number30
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 25 Jul 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Shewanella
Nanowires
Bioelectric Energy Sources
Cytochrome c Group
Electrons
Bacteria
Synechocystis
Secretory Pathway
Energy Transfer
Cyanobacteria
Metals
Genes

Keywords

  • Biofilms
  • Cytochromes
  • Electron transport
  • Microbial fuel cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • General

Cite this

Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms. / Gorby, Yuri A.; Yanina, Svetlana; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Moyles, Dianne; Dohnalkova, Alice; Beveridge, Terry J.; Chang, In Seop; Kim, Byung Hong; Kim, Kyung Shik; Culley, David E.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad A.; Hill, Eric A.; Shi, Liang; Elias, Dwayne A.; Kennedy, David W.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy; Watanabe, Kazuya; Ishii, Shun'ichi; Logan, Bruce; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 103, No. 30, 25.07.2006, p. 11358-11363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gorby, YA, Yanina, S, McLean, JS, Rosso, KM, Moyles, D, Dohnalkova, A, Beveridge, TJ, Chang, IS, Kim, BH, Kim, KS, Culley, DE, Reed, SB, Romine, MF, Saffarini, DA, Hill, EA, Shi, L, Elias, DA, Kennedy, DW, Pinchuk, G, Watanabe, K, Ishii, S, Logan, B, Nealson, KH & Fredrickson, JK 2006, 'Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms', Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 103, no. 30, pp. 11358-11363. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0604517103
Gorby, Yuri A. ; Yanina, Svetlana ; McLean, Jeffrey S. ; Rosso, Kevin M. ; Moyles, Dianne ; Dohnalkova, Alice ; Beveridge, Terry J. ; Chang, In Seop ; Kim, Byung Hong ; Kim, Kyung Shik ; Culley, David E. ; Reed, Samantha B. ; Romine, Margaret F. ; Saffarini, Daad A. ; Hill, Eric A. ; Shi, Liang ; Elias, Dwayne A. ; Kennedy, David W. ; Pinchuk, Grigoriy ; Watanabe, Kazuya ; Ishii, Shun'ichi ; Logan, Bruce ; Nealson, Kenneth H. ; Fredrickson, Jim K. / Electrically conductive bacterial nanowires produced by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 and other microorganisms. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 2006 ; Vol. 103, No. 30. pp. 11358-11363.
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AU - Kennedy, David W.

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AU - Watanabe, Kazuya

AU - Ishii, Shun'ichi

AU - Logan, Bruce

AU - Nealson, Kenneth H.

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