Efficient reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline with a biocatalyzed cathode

Ai Jie Wang, Hao Yi Cheng, Bin Liang, Nan Qi Ren, Dan Cui, Na Lin, Byung Hong Kim, Korneel Rabaey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

190 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Nitrobenzene (NB) is a toxic compound that is often found as a pollutant in the environment. The present removal strategies suffer from high cost or slow conversion rate. Here, we investigated the conversion of NB to aniline (AN), a less toxic endproduct that can easily be mineralized, using a fed-batch bioelectrochemical system with microbially catalyzed cathode. When a voltage of 0.5 V was applied in the presence of glucose, 88.2 ± 0.60% of the supplied NB (0.5 mM) was transformed to AN within 24 h, which was 10.25 and 2.90 times higher than an abiotic cathode and open circuit controlled experiment, respectively. AN was the only product detected during bioelectrochemical reduction of NB (maximum efficiency 98.70 ± 0.87%), whereas in abiotic conditions nitrosobenzene was observed as intermediate of NB reduction to AN (decreased efficiency to 73.75 ± 3.2%). When glucose was replaced by NaHCO 3, the rate of NB degradation decreased about 10%, selective transformation of NB to AN was still achieved (98.93 ± 0.77%). Upon autoclaving the cathode electrode, nitrosobenzene was formed as an intermediate, leading to a decreased AN formation efficiency of 71.6%. Cyclic voltammetry highlighted higher peak currents as well as decreased overpotentials for NB reduction at the biocathode. 16S rRNA based analysis of the biofilm on the cathode indicated that the cathode was dominated by an Enterococcus species closely related to Enterococcus aquimarinus.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10186-10193
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume45
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2011
Externally publishedYes

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Cathodes
glucose
biofilm
Poisons
electrode
degradation
pollutant
Glucose
cost
nitrobenzene
aniline
Biofilms
experiment
Cyclic voltammetry
rate
Degradation
Electrodes
Networks (circuits)
Electric potential
Costs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Wang, A. J., Cheng, H. Y., Liang, B., Ren, N. Q., Cui, D., Lin, N., ... Rabaey, K. (2011). Efficient reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline with a biocatalyzed cathode. Environmental Science and Technology, 45(23), 10186-10193. https://doi.org/10.1021/es202356w

Efficient reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline with a biocatalyzed cathode. / Wang, Ai Jie; Cheng, Hao Yi; Liang, Bin; Ren, Nan Qi; Cui, Dan; Lin, Na; Kim, Byung Hong; Rabaey, Korneel.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 45, No. 23, 01.12.2011, p. 10186-10193.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wang, AJ, Cheng, HY, Liang, B, Ren, NQ, Cui, D, Lin, N, Kim, BH & Rabaey, K 2011, 'Efficient reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline with a biocatalyzed cathode', Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 45, no. 23, pp. 10186-10193. https://doi.org/10.1021/es202356w
Wang, Ai Jie ; Cheng, Hao Yi ; Liang, Bin ; Ren, Nan Qi ; Cui, Dan ; Lin, Na ; Kim, Byung Hong ; Rabaey, Korneel. / Efficient reduction of nitrobenzene to aniline with a biocatalyzed cathode. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2011 ; Vol. 45, No. 23. pp. 10186-10193.
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