Efficacy of a newly developed auditory–cognitive training system on speech recognition, central auditory processing and cognitive ability among older adults with normal cognition and with neurocognitive impairment

Yusmeera Yusof, Siti Zamratol Mai Sarah Mukari, Mariam Adawiah Dzulkifli, Kalaivani Chellapan, Kartini Ahmad, Ismarulyusda Ishak, Nashrah Maamor, Wan Syafira Ishak

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of a newly developed auditory–cognitive training system on speech recognition, central auditory processing and cognition among older adults with normal cognition (NC) and with neurocognitive impairment (NCI). Methods: A double-blind quasi-experiment was carried out on NC (n = 43) and NCI (n = 33) groups. Participants in each group were randomly assigned into treatment and control programs groups. The treatment group underwent auditory–cognitive training, whereas the control group was assigned to watch documentary videos, three times per week, for 8 consecutive weeks. Study outcomes that included Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Malay Hearing in Noise Test, Dichotic Digit Test, Gaps in Noise Test and Pitch Pattern Sequence Test were measured at 4-week intervals at baseline, and weeks 4, 8 and 12. Results: Mixed design anova showed significant training effects in total Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Dichotic Digit Test in both groups, NC (P < 0.001) and NCI (P < 0.01). The NC group also showed significant training effects in the Malay Hearing in Noise Test (quiet) (P < 0.01), Gaps in Noise Test (P < 0.001) and Pitch Pattern Sequence Test (humming) (P < 0.05). All training effects were sustained up to 4 weeks after the training ended. Conclusions: The present study suggests that the newly developed auditory–cognitive training system has the potential to improve general cognition and some of the auditory processing abilities in both the NC and NCI groups. Because of the short test–retest intervals used in the present study, it is possible that the training effects were influenced by learning effect and, therefore, should be considered cautiously. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019; ••: ••–••.

Original languageEnglish
JournalGeriatrics and Gerontology International
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Fingerprint

Aptitude
cognitive ability
Cognition
cognition
Noise
Group
Hearing
Control Groups
learning success
Recognition (Psychology)
Double-Blind Method
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Learning
video
Therapeutics
experiment
ability

Keywords

  • auditory processing
  • auditory–cognitive training
  • cognition
  • elderly
  • speech recognition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Gerontology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

@article{957958ae1adc42a5b0414ab30518606f,
title = "Efficacy of a newly developed auditory–cognitive training system on speech recognition, central auditory processing and cognitive ability among older adults with normal cognition and with neurocognitive impairment",
abstract = "Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of a newly developed auditory–cognitive training system on speech recognition, central auditory processing and cognition among older adults with normal cognition (NC) and with neurocognitive impairment (NCI). Methods: A double-blind quasi-experiment was carried out on NC (n = 43) and NCI (n = 33) groups. Participants in each group were randomly assigned into treatment and control programs groups. The treatment group underwent auditory–cognitive training, whereas the control group was assigned to watch documentary videos, three times per week, for 8 consecutive weeks. Study outcomes that included Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Malay Hearing in Noise Test, Dichotic Digit Test, Gaps in Noise Test and Pitch Pattern Sequence Test were measured at 4-week intervals at baseline, and weeks 4, 8 and 12. Results: Mixed design anova showed significant training effects in total Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Dichotic Digit Test in both groups, NC (P < 0.001) and NCI (P < 0.01). The NC group also showed significant training effects in the Malay Hearing in Noise Test (quiet) (P < 0.01), Gaps in Noise Test (P < 0.001) and Pitch Pattern Sequence Test (humming) (P < 0.05). All training effects were sustained up to 4 weeks after the training ended. Conclusions: The present study suggests that the newly developed auditory–cognitive training system has the potential to improve general cognition and some of the auditory processing abilities in both the NC and NCI groups. Because of the short test–retest intervals used in the present study, it is possible that the training effects were influenced by learning effect and, therefore, should be considered cautiously. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019; ••: ••–••.",
keywords = "auditory processing, auditory–cognitive training, cognition, elderly, speech recognition",
author = "Yusmeera Yusof and Mukari, {Siti Zamratol Mai Sarah} and Dzulkifli, {Mariam Adawiah} and Kalaivani Chellapan and Kartini Ahmad and Ismarulyusda Ishak and Nashrah Maamor and Ishak, {Wan Syafira}",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/ggi.13710",
language = "English",
journal = "Geriatrics and Gerontology International",
issn = "1447-0594",
publisher = "Japan Geriatrics Society",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Efficacy of a newly developed auditory–cognitive training system on speech recognition, central auditory processing and cognitive ability among older adults with normal cognition and with neurocognitive impairment

AU - Yusof, Yusmeera

AU - Mukari, Siti Zamratol Mai Sarah

AU - Dzulkifli, Mariam Adawiah

AU - Chellapan, Kalaivani

AU - Ahmad, Kartini

AU - Ishak, Ismarulyusda

AU - Maamor, Nashrah

AU - Ishak, Wan Syafira

PY - 2019/1/1

Y1 - 2019/1/1

N2 - Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of a newly developed auditory–cognitive training system on speech recognition, central auditory processing and cognition among older adults with normal cognition (NC) and with neurocognitive impairment (NCI). Methods: A double-blind quasi-experiment was carried out on NC (n = 43) and NCI (n = 33) groups. Participants in each group were randomly assigned into treatment and control programs groups. The treatment group underwent auditory–cognitive training, whereas the control group was assigned to watch documentary videos, three times per week, for 8 consecutive weeks. Study outcomes that included Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Malay Hearing in Noise Test, Dichotic Digit Test, Gaps in Noise Test and Pitch Pattern Sequence Test were measured at 4-week intervals at baseline, and weeks 4, 8 and 12. Results: Mixed design anova showed significant training effects in total Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Dichotic Digit Test in both groups, NC (P < 0.001) and NCI (P < 0.01). The NC group also showed significant training effects in the Malay Hearing in Noise Test (quiet) (P < 0.01), Gaps in Noise Test (P < 0.001) and Pitch Pattern Sequence Test (humming) (P < 0.05). All training effects were sustained up to 4 weeks after the training ended. Conclusions: The present study suggests that the newly developed auditory–cognitive training system has the potential to improve general cognition and some of the auditory processing abilities in both the NC and NCI groups. Because of the short test–retest intervals used in the present study, it is possible that the training effects were influenced by learning effect and, therefore, should be considered cautiously. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019; ••: ••–••.

AB - Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of a newly developed auditory–cognitive training system on speech recognition, central auditory processing and cognition among older adults with normal cognition (NC) and with neurocognitive impairment (NCI). Methods: A double-blind quasi-experiment was carried out on NC (n = 43) and NCI (n = 33) groups. Participants in each group were randomly assigned into treatment and control programs groups. The treatment group underwent auditory–cognitive training, whereas the control group was assigned to watch documentary videos, three times per week, for 8 consecutive weeks. Study outcomes that included Montreal Cognitive Assessment, Malay Hearing in Noise Test, Dichotic Digit Test, Gaps in Noise Test and Pitch Pattern Sequence Test were measured at 4-week intervals at baseline, and weeks 4, 8 and 12. Results: Mixed design anova showed significant training effects in total Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Dichotic Digit Test in both groups, NC (P < 0.001) and NCI (P < 0.01). The NC group also showed significant training effects in the Malay Hearing in Noise Test (quiet) (P < 0.01), Gaps in Noise Test (P < 0.001) and Pitch Pattern Sequence Test (humming) (P < 0.05). All training effects were sustained up to 4 weeks after the training ended. Conclusions: The present study suggests that the newly developed auditory–cognitive training system has the potential to improve general cognition and some of the auditory processing abilities in both the NC and NCI groups. Because of the short test–retest intervals used in the present study, it is possible that the training effects were influenced by learning effect and, therefore, should be considered cautiously. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2019; ••: ••–••.

KW - auditory processing

KW - auditory–cognitive training

KW - cognition

KW - elderly

KW - speech recognition

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