Effects of substerilizing doses of gamma radiation on adult longevity and level of inherited sterility in Teia anartoides (Lepidoptera

Lymantriidae)

Wee Suk Ling, D. M. Suckling, G. M. Burnip, J. Hackett, A. Barrington, R. Pedley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of substerilizing doses of gamma radiation on the longevity and level of inherited sterility in the Australian moth Teia anartoides Walker were determined. Six day-old male pupae were treated with 0, 100, and 160 Gy of gamma radiation by using a 1.25 MeV Cobalt60 irradiation source. Laboratory studies of male longevity showed that radiation had little impact in adult moths of the P1, F1, and F2 generations. Inherited deleterious effects resulting from irradiation were observed in the progeny of F1 and F2 generations. Outcrosses between substerile parental males or their highly sterile male progeny to wild-type females did not affect female fecundity. However, adverse effects were observed for these crosses in the rates of successful egg hatch and postembryonic development. Fertility was always greater in out-crosses involving a P1 male than in any of the F1 out-crosses. F1 males were always more sterile than F1 females, and the level of sterility for the F1 and F2 generations was higher than that of the controls. The incidence of larval and pupal mortality was higher in the F 2 than the F1 generation. A dose of 100 Gy had the highest success in inducing deleterious effects that were inherited through to the F2 generation. Our results indicated that the use of partially sterilizing doses of radiation has good potential as a selective strategy for management or eradication of T. anartoides.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)732-738
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Economic Entomology
Volume98
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2005
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Lymantriidae
sterility
gamma radiation
Lepidoptera
dosage
moth
moths
irradiation
sterilizing
pupa
pupae
fecundity
Teia anartoides
effect
dose
fertility
adverse effects
egg
incidence
mortality

Keywords

  • Fecundity
  • Inherited sterility
  • Irradiation
  • Longevity
  • Lymantriid

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science

Cite this

Effects of substerilizing doses of gamma radiation on adult longevity and level of inherited sterility in Teia anartoides (Lepidoptera : Lymantriidae). / Suk Ling, Wee; Suckling, D. M.; Burnip, G. M.; Hackett, J.; Barrington, A.; Pedley, R.

In: Journal of Economic Entomology, Vol. 98, No. 3, 06.2005, p. 732-738.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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