Effects of hydration practices on the severity of heat-related illness among municipal workers during a heat wave phenomenon

Zawiah Mansor, Rosnah Ismail, Noor Hassim Ismail, Jamal Hisham Hashim

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction: The continue rise in temperatures due to climate change increases the risk of heat-related illness (HRI) among outdoor workers. This study aims to evaluate the effects of hydration practices on the severity of HRI during a heat wave episode among municipal workers in Negeri Sembilan. Method: A cross-sectional study was performed in March and April 2016. The outdoor temperatures were measured using the wet-bulb globe temperature (WBGT) tool. The participants completed a self-administered questionnaire containing sociodemographic factors prior to work shift; while working profile, hydration practices, and HRI symptoms at the end of work shift. The hydration status of the respondents was assessed by direct observation of their urine colour. Multiple logistic regression was performed to ascertain the effects of age, working profile, hydration practice, history of previous HRI, and hydration status on the likelihood that outdoor workers having moderate to severe HRI. Results: A total of 320 respondents completed the questionnaire. The mean (standard deviation) outdoor workplace temperature was 30.5°C (SD 0.53°C). The percentage of respondents who experienced moderate to severe HRI was 44.1%. The likelihood that outdoor workers experienced moderate to severe HRI symptoms was associated with irregular fluid intake [odds ratio (OR): 16.11, 95% confidence interval (95%CI): 4.11; 63.20]; consumption of non-plain water (OR: 5.92, 95%CI: 2.79; 12.56); dehydration (OR: 3.32, 95%CI: 1.92; 5.74); and increasing outdoor workplace temperature (OR: 1.85, 95%CI: 1.09; 3.11). Conclusion: Irregular drinking pattern and non-plain fluid intake was found to have a large effect on HRI severity among outdoor workers exposed high temperatures during a heat wave phenomenon.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)275-280
Number of pages6
JournalMedical Journal of Malaysia
Volume74
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2019

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Infrared Rays
Hot Temperature
Temperature
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Workplace
Climate Change
Dehydration
Drinking
Color
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Observation
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urine
Water

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Heat-related illness
  • Hydration practice
  • Outdoor work place temperature

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of hydration practices on the severity of heat-related illness among municipal workers during a heat wave phenomenon. / Mansor, Zawiah; Ismail, Rosnah; Ismail, Noor Hassim; Hashim, Jamal Hisham.

In: Medical Journal of Malaysia, Vol. 74, No. 4, 01.08.2019, p. 275-280.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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