Effects of back belt on vertical load transfer among adults with non-specific low back pain during asymmetrical manual load carrying

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a back belt on vertical load transfer in terms of carrying using a single dominant hand, lumbopelvic muscle strength, and perceived difficulty in performing an active straight lower limb raise (ASLR) test among adults with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP). A total of 20 adults with NSLBP and 20 matched individuals without low back pain (LBP) participated in this study. Vertical load transfer was measured via a Matscan pressure assessment system for both standing and walking scenarios while carrying incremental loads. Lumbopelvic muscle strength during prone hip extension (PHE) test was assessed using a handheld dynamometer. Perceived difficulty in performing the ASLR test was measured with a 6-point Likert scale. A three-way ANOVA was conducted to examine the effects of vertical load transfer. Lumbopelvic muscle strength and perceived difficulty were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA. The results demonstrated an increase in vertical load transfer, increased lumbopelvic muscle strength, and decreased perceived difficulty in performing ASLR test with use of a back belt. The findings suggest that the use of a back belt in adults with NSLBP may improve vertical load transfer during load-carrying tasks, maximize lumbopelvic muscle strength, and decrease perceived difficulty in performing a task. This is relevant to industry, as use of a back belt is an option for industrial workers with NSLBP during manual load carrying to optimize vertical load transfer and personal comfort.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)156-163
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Industrial Ergonomics
Volume61
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017

Fingerprint

Muscle Strength
Low Back Pain
Muscle
pain
Lower Extremity
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
Analysis of Variance
Dynamometers
industrial worker
Walking
Hip
Industry
Hand
Pressure
scenario
industry

Keywords

  • Back belt
  • Contact area
  • Low back pain
  • Lumbopelvic muscle strength
  • Maximum force
  • Plantar pressure

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

@article{514add1769d44d56b1d2aa5ab96a7077,
title = "Effects of back belt on vertical load transfer among adults with non-specific low back pain during asymmetrical manual load carrying",
abstract = "The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a back belt on vertical load transfer in terms of carrying using a single dominant hand, lumbopelvic muscle strength, and perceived difficulty in performing an active straight lower limb raise (ASLR) test among adults with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP). A total of 20 adults with NSLBP and 20 matched individuals without low back pain (LBP) participated in this study. Vertical load transfer was measured via a Matscan pressure assessment system for both standing and walking scenarios while carrying incremental loads. Lumbopelvic muscle strength during prone hip extension (PHE) test was assessed using a handheld dynamometer. Perceived difficulty in performing the ASLR test was measured with a 6-point Likert scale. A three-way ANOVA was conducted to examine the effects of vertical load transfer. Lumbopelvic muscle strength and perceived difficulty were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA. The results demonstrated an increase in vertical load transfer, increased lumbopelvic muscle strength, and decreased perceived difficulty in performing ASLR test with use of a back belt. The findings suggest that the use of a back belt in adults with NSLBP may improve vertical load transfer during load-carrying tasks, maximize lumbopelvic muscle strength, and decrease perceived difficulty in performing a task. This is relevant to industry, as use of a back belt is an option for industrial workers with NSLBP during manual load carrying to optimize vertical load transfer and personal comfort.",
keywords = "Back belt, Contact area, Low back pain, Lumbopelvic muscle strength, Maximum force, Plantar pressure",
author = "Deepashini Harithasan and {Ajit Singh}, {Devinder Kaur} and Baharudin Omar",
year = "2017",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ergon.2017.05.003",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "156--163",
journal = "International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics",
issn = "0169-8141",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of back belt on vertical load transfer among adults with non-specific low back pain during asymmetrical manual load carrying

AU - Harithasan, Deepashini

AU - Ajit Singh, Devinder Kaur

AU - Omar, Baharudin

PY - 2017/9/1

Y1 - 2017/9/1

N2 - The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a back belt on vertical load transfer in terms of carrying using a single dominant hand, lumbopelvic muscle strength, and perceived difficulty in performing an active straight lower limb raise (ASLR) test among adults with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP). A total of 20 adults with NSLBP and 20 matched individuals without low back pain (LBP) participated in this study. Vertical load transfer was measured via a Matscan pressure assessment system for both standing and walking scenarios while carrying incremental loads. Lumbopelvic muscle strength during prone hip extension (PHE) test was assessed using a handheld dynamometer. Perceived difficulty in performing the ASLR test was measured with a 6-point Likert scale. A three-way ANOVA was conducted to examine the effects of vertical load transfer. Lumbopelvic muscle strength and perceived difficulty were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA. The results demonstrated an increase in vertical load transfer, increased lumbopelvic muscle strength, and decreased perceived difficulty in performing ASLR test with use of a back belt. The findings suggest that the use of a back belt in adults with NSLBP may improve vertical load transfer during load-carrying tasks, maximize lumbopelvic muscle strength, and decrease perceived difficulty in performing a task. This is relevant to industry, as use of a back belt is an option for industrial workers with NSLBP during manual load carrying to optimize vertical load transfer and personal comfort.

AB - The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a back belt on vertical load transfer in terms of carrying using a single dominant hand, lumbopelvic muscle strength, and perceived difficulty in performing an active straight lower limb raise (ASLR) test among adults with non-specific low back pain (NSLBP). A total of 20 adults with NSLBP and 20 matched individuals without low back pain (LBP) participated in this study. Vertical load transfer was measured via a Matscan pressure assessment system for both standing and walking scenarios while carrying incremental loads. Lumbopelvic muscle strength during prone hip extension (PHE) test was assessed using a handheld dynamometer. Perceived difficulty in performing the ASLR test was measured with a 6-point Likert scale. A three-way ANOVA was conducted to examine the effects of vertical load transfer. Lumbopelvic muscle strength and perceived difficulty were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA. The results demonstrated an increase in vertical load transfer, increased lumbopelvic muscle strength, and decreased perceived difficulty in performing ASLR test with use of a back belt. The findings suggest that the use of a back belt in adults with NSLBP may improve vertical load transfer during load-carrying tasks, maximize lumbopelvic muscle strength, and decrease perceived difficulty in performing a task. This is relevant to industry, as use of a back belt is an option for industrial workers with NSLBP during manual load carrying to optimize vertical load transfer and personal comfort.

KW - Back belt

KW - Contact area

KW - Low back pain

KW - Lumbopelvic muscle strength

KW - Maximum force

KW - Plantar pressure

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85020917163&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85020917163&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ergon.2017.05.003

DO - 10.1016/j.ergon.2017.05.003

M3 - Article

VL - 61

SP - 156

EP - 163

JO - International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics

JF - International Journal of Industrial Ergonomics

SN - 0169-8141

ER -